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Here & Now

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Anchored by Frederica Freyberg, Here & Now is Wisconsin’s weekly in-depth news and public affairs program where civic and political leaders provide context to the issues at the forefront of life in Wisconsin.

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Featured Video

July 21, 2017
Wisconsin Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald details key issues in budget impasse.
July 14, 2017

Juveniles at the Lincoln Hills Correctional Facility can expect fewer days in solitary confinement and less pepper spray in the future. The Wisconsin Department of Corrections says it will not appeal a federal judge's ruling on prisoner treatment. We speak with Patrick Marley, reporter for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, about the remaining lawsuits and federal investigations of Lincoln Hills.

July 14, 2017

On today's show we examine: the latest on health care proposals with U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin; a new study that compares the tax freeze impact on the state budgets of Kansas and Wisconsin, the ongoing legal troubles for the state juvenile corrections school Lincoln Hills; an update on the state budget standoff, and massive flooding in southeastern Wisconsin.

July 7, 2017
As part of a court case reviewing the treatment of youth at a state-run juvenile detention facility, the ACLU of Milwaukee submitted a videotape that was recorded inside the Lincoln Hills institution. The tape shows inmates being pepper sprayed repeatedly. A federal judge recently ruled the facility must limit its use of pepper spray. Warning: video includes graphic language.
July 7, 2017
As part of a court case reviewing the treatment of youth at a state-run juvenile detention facility, the ACLU of Milwaukee submitted a videotape that was recorded inside the Copper Lake institution. The tape shows female inmates being pepper sprayed repeatedly. A federal judge recently ruled the facility must limit its use of pepper spray. Warning: video includes graphic language.
July 7, 2017

On today’s show, we examine: Wisconsin's response to the White House request for state voter information; a court action related to the state's juvenile correctional facility for boys, Lincoln Hills; Republican debates stall state budget compromise; jobs remain unfilled in Wisconsin tourism industry because of foreign workers visa shortage; Board of Regents reallocate some UW-Madison state funds.

July 7, 2017

Today was the deadline a federal judge in Madison set for two sides in a lawsuit over conditions at Lincoln Hills and Copper Lake state juvenile detention facilities to submit a plan for how to substantially change how inmates are treated, including the use of pepper spray and solidarity confinement. The facility is also under federal criminal investigation for prisoner abuse and child neglect.

July 7, 2017

The Trump administration wants states to hand over voting records in its supposed effort to address election fraud. In a letter sent to Wisconsin, the special commission wants names, addresses, birthdates, partial social security numbers, voting history, and more. We speak to Reid Magney of the Wisconsin Elections Commission, who explains that under state law, they cannot supply that information.

July 7, 2017

The shortage of foreign worker visas is leaving Wisconsin hotels and tourist attractions struggling to find seasonal employees. Trisha Pugal, CEO of Wisconsin Hotel and Lodging Association, explains that many areas do not have the residential base to fill all their open jobs. "The challenge is to fill all the positions and shifts while competing with other industries experiencing shortages."

July 7, 2017

For weeks now, big-ticket items in Washington and Wisconsin remain stuck in neutral, failing to get traction to move ahead. We talk to former state legislator and UW-Milwaukee Prof. Mordecai Lee about federal health care policy and the state budget impasse. "When someone draws a line in drying concrete," Lee says of Gov. Scott Walker's budget position, "the concept of a compromise falls apart."

July 7, 2017

The UW-System Board of Regents voted almost unanimously on to reduce UW-Madison's share of state funding by more than a third this year — to $2.9 million. The reason? Regents say the other University of Wisconsin campuses need the money more. A lobbying group made up of UW-Madison alumni and donors is worried the budget cut could affect UW-Madison's standing as the system's flagship institution.

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