History | Page 3 | Wisconsin Public Television

History

History

Mexican Migrant Workers in Mid-Century Wisconsin

Sergio González, Doctoral Student in the Department of History at UW-Madison, shares stories of Mexican citizens and Texas-born Mexican Americans who were recruited to work in Wisconsin’s agricultural, industrial and transportation industries in the mid twentieth century.

The Wesley W. Jung Carriage Collection

Jim Willaert, Curator at the Wisconsin Historical Society, shares the history of the Wesley S. Jung family and their carriage building business. As the carriage age ended, Jung collected and restored hundreds of carriages. Willaert shares stories of some of the finest pieces which are on display at the Wade House Historic Site.

Science and the Founders of Jewish Studies

Amos Bitzan, Assistant Professor in the Department of History at UW-Madison, discusses early 19th century history that led Jewish scholars to look to Wissenschaft, or the sciences, for answers to religious and cultural issues.

Historic Aerial Photography in Wisconsin

Jaime Martindale, Map & GIS Data Librarian, and A.J. Wortley, Senior Outreach Specialist, in the Department of Geography at UW-Madison, discuss the Wisconsin Historic Aerial Imagery Finder project, an online application which houses some of the oldest aerial imagery in Wisconsin. Photos from 1937 through 1941 have been digitally restored and are available for viewing and downloading on the site.

Adventures Hiking the Ice Age Trail

Melanie Radzicki McManus, Author, “Thousand-Miler: Adventures Hiking the Ice Age Trail,” recounts her journey as a thru-hiker on the Ice Age Trail. McManus, who completed the 1,100 mile hike around Wisconsin in thirty six days, shares the history of the trail.

The Discovery of Niacin at UW-Madison

Dave Nelson, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Biochemistry at UW-Madison, discusses the identification of a new vitamin found in fresh meat and yeast by Conrad Arnold Elvehjem at UW-Madison in 1937. Elvehjem’s experiments proved that nicotinic acid, also known as niacin or vitamin B3, was a cure for pellagra.

Science for the People: Visnshaft in Yiddish

Tony Michels, Director of the Center for Jewish Studies at UW-Madison, explores Visnshaft, a movement designed to bring the entirety of scholarly knowledge to the Jewish immigrant community in Yiddish, their native language.

A History of Courtship and Weddings, 1830-1990

Leslie Bellais, Curator of Social History at the Wisconsin Historical Society, explores trends in courtship and wedding traditions from 1830-1990. Bellais explains that the rituals of courtship and marriage provide a sense of importance to the events and provides links to the past and the future.

Fran and Frederick Hamerstrom

Susan Tupper, Author of “Fran and Frederick Hamerstrom,” shares stories of the Hamerstroms, a husband and wife team who have been credited with saving the prairie chicken from extinction.

Jews and the Science of "Race" in America

Eric Goldstein, Director of the Institute for Jewish Studies at Emory University, discusses the classification of Jews as the “Hebrew race” in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Goldstein explores the categorizing of immigrant ethnic groups as a means of organizing and understanding each group’s place in society.

Pages

Share this page

Subscribe to RSS - History