Wednesday Nite @ the Lab | Page 2 | Wisconsin Public Television

Wednesday Nite @ the Lab

Willard Grosvenor Bleyer and UW Journalism

Caitlin Cieslik-Miskimen, Doctoral Student in the UW School of Journalism and Mass Communication, discusses the contributions Willard Grosvenor Bleyer made to journalism education at the University of Wisconsin in the early 20th century. Bleyer established the first journalism course at UW and published the “Press Bulletin” which introduced the public to classroom and laboratory discoveries.

Unraveling Bacterial Biofilm Development

Julia Nepper, Research Assistant in Biophysics at UW-Madison, explains how bacteria unite to form a single community called a biofilm. Nepper focuses on E. coli biofilms and the lipids found in the E. coli cell membrane.

Crane Health: Avian Medicine in Conservation

Barry Hartup, Director of Veterinary Services at the International Crane Foundation, discusses his work as a zoological veterinarian keeping 15 crane species heathy at the International Crane Foundation. Hartup shares stories of injuries the birds have survived.

Designing and Building the New UW Meat Science Lab

Jeff Sindelar, Associate Professor in the Department of Animal Science at UW-Madison, explains the importance of the meat industry in Wisconsin. Sindelar discusses the vision of the meat science program and the process of designing and constructing a new building for the Meat Sciences Laboratory at UW-Madison.

Midwest Center of Excellence for Vector-Borne Disease

Susan Paskewitz, Director of the Midwest Center of Excellence for Vector-Borne Disease, explains how the center came into being and discusses vector-borne diseases caused by tick and mosquito bites.

Diving the Flooded Mines of Baraboo’s Iron Range

Tamara Thomsen, Maritime Archaeologist at the Wisconsin Historical Society, and Mark Langenfeld, a Retired Attorney, discuss the history of the mines in the Baraboo Iron Range. Thomsen shares videos of her group of certified cave divers who explored the flooded mines, swimming past mining equipment that was left behind when the mine flooded.

How Homo Naledi is Changing Human Origins

John Hawks, Professor in the Department of Anthropology at UW-Madison, discusses new findings related to the Homo naledi fossils found in the Rising Star cave system in South Africa. Hawks reports that the fossils indicate this primitive, extinct, human relative may have been in existence as recently as 236,000 years ago.

Significance of Homo Naledi Limb Proportions

Sarah Traynor, Associate Lecturer of Anatomy at the UW School of Medicine and Public Health, explains the work of the teams who are analyzing the Homo naledi fossils found in South Africa. Traynor discusses her work determining the proportions of the upper and lower limbs of the hominin species and shares the impact these findings have on our understanding of their movements.

Investigating Smoke on the Greenland Ice Sheet

Ross Edwards, Visiting Professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering at UW-Madison, discusses black carbon “smoke” nanoparticles on the surface of ice sheets in Greenland. Edwards traversed the country on a solar-powered Inuit Windsled, taking samples of the black carbon left behind from fires and fossil-fuel combustion.

The History and Science of Children with Disabilities

Walton O. Schalick, III, Clinical Assistant Professor in Orthopedics and Rehabilitation at the UW Medical School, discusses how children with disabilities were historically treated. Schalick highlights the medical and scientific innovations inspired by the needs of the children.

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