Wednesday Nite @ the Lab | Wisconsin Public Television

Wednesday Nite @ the Lab

Analyzing Stains in Medieval Manuscripts

Heather Wacha, Postdoctoral Fellow in Data Curation for Medieval Studies, and Leah Parker, PhD Candidate in the Department of English, both at UW-Madison, introduce the Library of Stains project which uses multispectral imaging and data analysis to determine the environment surrounding medieval manuscripts, parchment paper and bindings.

Origin of Life as a Chemical Ecological Problem

David Baum, Professor in the Department of Botany at UW-Madison, explains that cells can be viewed as chemical species which can self-propagate and evolve to create genetic systems. Baum discusses the implications of this ecological approach for understanding the origins of life.

Designing the Next Generation of Nuclear Reactors

Raluca Scarlat, Assistant Professor of Engineering Physics at UW-Madison, discusses why we should consider using nuclear energy, our role in global energy production, the future of nuclear technology and the energy research taking place at UW-Madison.

Lampricides in Tributaries of the Great Lakes

Christy Remucal, Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at UW-Madison, discusses the use of chemicals designed to kill the larva of invasive sea lampreys and focuses on the environmental impact of the lampricides. Remucal presents research results showing the amount of time it takes the chemicals to be degraded by sunlight.

Hurricanes: Advancements in Our Understanding

Derrick Herndon, Assistant Researcher at the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies at UW-Madison, explains the basics of hurricanes including how they form and the challenges of predicting their paths.

The Digital Mappa Project

Martin Foys, Professor in the Department of English at UW-Madison, discusses an online resource, Digital Mappa, which allows anyone to upload images or text then link, annotate, search and share the collections. Foys explains how this project is can be used and walks through the process.

Pig Avatars: Models for Precision Medicine

Dhanansayan Shanmuganayagam, Assistant Professor in the Department of Animal Sciences, and Charles Konsitzke, Associate Director of the Biotechnology Center at UW-Madison, discuss the use of swine to study human diseases. Pigs have a similar anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology to humans and can be studied to find effective diagnosis and therapeutic technologies.

Groundwater, Wetlands, and Geology

Kenneth Bradbury, State Geologist and Director of the WI Geological & Natural History Survey at UW-Extension, explains the connection between wetlands, surface water, and groundwater and the ability of the water systems to change over time. Bradbury discusses how the glacial geology of the upper Midwest effects the groundwater and the wetlands.

Early Brain and Child Development

Dipesh Navsaria, Associate Professor of Pediatrics at the UW School of Medicine and Public Health, discusses the importance of interactions between child and parents during the first 1,000 days of life. Navsaria focuses on the lifelong impact early adversity has on children and offers suggestions for addressing the issues.

Science and Art of Prions and Other Pathogens

Byron Caughey, Senior Investigator at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, explores how prions, or misfolded proteins, can produce neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. Pamela Caughey, a Studio Artist, discusses her art installation, Ubiquitous: Migration of Pathogens, which consists of electron micrographs of the prion pathogens.

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