History Sandwiched In | Wisconsin Public Television

History Sandwiched In

Wisconsin and the Shaping of American Law

Joseph A. Ranney, Adjunct Professor at Marquette University Law School, discusses the regional and national patterns that contribute to and shape Wisconsin’s laws. Ranney examines how Wisconsin has influenced national laws.

Pioneer Spirit and the Laura Ingalls Wilder Family

Jennifer Van Haaften, Assistant Director of the Wisconsin Veterans Museum, discusses how the lives of Laura Ingalls Wilder’s pioneer family was portrayed in her novels and presents a more complex image of what it was like to live on the prairie during the late nineteenth century.

Indian Mounds of Wisconsin

Robert Birmingham, Co-Author of “Indian Mounds of Wisconsin,” provides an overview of the effigy mounds, created by American Indians. Birmingham contends that the mounds model the Native American belief system and their relationship with the spirit world.

Black Suffrage in Early Wisconsin

Christy Clark-Pujara, Associate Professor in the Department of History at UW-Madison, explores the history of black male disenfranchisement during the first years of Wisconsin’s statehood. This exclusion at the ballot box ultimately resulted in Wisconsin becoming the first state where black men could vote.

Pinery Boys: Lumberjack Songs of the Upper Midwest

James P. Leary, UW-Madison Professor Emeritus and co-author of “Pinery Boys: Songs and Songcatching in the Lumberjack Era,” recounts the story of Franz Rickaby, a scholar who collected the tunes and lyrics of songs sung by lumberjacks in the lumber camps of the Upper Midwest. Leary shares recordings of the songs.

J.R.R. Tolkien in Wisconsin

William Fliss, Archivist for the Special Collections and University Archives at Marquette University, explains how Marquette University became the owner of the original papers and manuscripts written by J.R.R. Tolkien. The collection includes “The Hobbit,” The Lord of the Rings,” and “Farmer Giles of Ham” and other works by Tolkien.

Workers, Leisure and Social Control in the Paper Valley

Jillian Jacklin, Doctoral Candidate in the Department of History at UW-Madison, focuses on conflicts between industrialists and their workforces over leisure time activities in the Fox River Valley during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Jacklin discusses the connection between the effort to eradicate immoral behavior and the rise of the Progressive Party in Wisconsin.

Mexican Migrant Workers in Mid-Century Wisconsin

Sergio González, Doctoral Student in the Department of History at UW-Madison, shares stories of Mexican citizens and Texas-born Mexican Americans who were recruited to work in Wisconsin’s agricultural, industrial and transportation industries in the mid twentieth century.

The Wesley W. Jung Carriage Collection

Jim Willaert, Curator at the Wisconsin Historical Society, shares the history of the Wesley S. Jung family and their carriage building business. As the carriage age ended, Jung collected and restored hundreds of carriages. Willaert shares stories of some of the finest pieces which are on display at the Wade House Historic Site.

Adventures Hiking the Ice Age Trail

Melanie Radzicki McManus, Author, “Thousand-Miler: Adventures Hiking the Ice Age Trail,” recounts her journey as a thru-hiker on the Ice Age Trail. McManus, who completed the 1,100 mile hike around Wisconsin in thirty six days, shares the history of the trail.

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