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Here & Now for Dec. 29, 2017

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Premiere Date: 
December 29, 2017

Here & Now for Dec. 29, 2017

On tonight's special year-end show: panelists Bill McCoshen and Scot Ross sit down for an in-depth discussion on this year's and next's political news in Wisconsin. They share their thoughts on the race for governor, including the long list of Democrats seeking to challenge Scott Walker. They also weigh in on the race for U.S. Senate, which they predict could be as 'dramatic' as the 2012 recall.

Episode Transcript

Frederica Freyberg:

I'm Frederica Freyberg. Tonight, a special edition of “Here and Now.” A gaze into the political crystal ball for 2018 with our political panelists Bill McCoshen and Scot Ross. The dynamic duo will make predictions for the governor's race, then forecast the 2018 U.S. Senate race as well as take a look ahead to campaign party strategies. It's “Here and Now” for December 29.

Announcer:

Funding for “Here and Now” is provided in part by Friends of Wisconsin Public Television.

Frederica Freyberg:

First up tonight, forecasting the 2018 race for governor, a race where incumbent Scott Walker will face third party opponents as well as the winner of a crowded Democratic primary. The Democratic primary that promises to get even more crowded in the new year.

Scott Walker:

Rebecca and I are asking for four more years to serve as your governor and lieutenant governor, to move Wisconsin forward!

[cheers and applause]

Frederica Freyberg:

With that announcement earlier this month, the race is on.

Scott Walker:

Four more years. Four more years to keep moving this state forward. And looking ahead. We want a state where everyone shares, everyone shares in our economic prosperity, whether you live in a big city or a small town.

Frederica Freyberg:

And the incumbent figures to power through.

Mordecai Lee:

Scott Walker had a near-death experience as a result of his run for president.

Frederica Freyberg:

UW-Milwaukee Political Scientist Mordecai Lee says the bottom dropped out for Scott Walker at that time, his polling in the mid-30s.

Scott Walker:

Today, I believe that I’m being called to lead by helping to clear the field in this race so that a positive, conservative message can rise to the top of the field. With this in mind, I will suspend my campaign.

Frederica Freyberg:

But he's back, his numbers in a position to win. Lee calls him a political Ever-Ready battery.

Mordecai Lee:

I think we should recognize that the way he clawed his way back to political viability is an indication of his political skills. Notwithstanding all the criticisms that Democrats will make of him, one has to respect what an adaptable and fleet-footed politician he is.

Frederica Freyberg:

And there's no shortage of Democrats jumping on board. At least 15 so far. Walker says they're all the same. Not so say the candidates we've interviewed, when asked what sets them apart from each other, starting with Tony Evers, who has won three statewide races for superintendent of public schools.

Tony Evers:

The last time I won with 70% of the vote. I won 70 of 72 counties.

Andy Gronik:

Someone who's helped companies solve problems and access billions of dollars a year so they could grow and create jobs. It's a very different skill set.

Mike McCabe:

They all have at least one thing in common. They seem very, very comfortable operating within the political system as it currently functions. And I’m not.

Dana Wachs:

I think being an advocate for the middle class, I think I’m best-suited to take our case into that building and make sure that the middle class is being heard.

Kathleen Vinehout:

I come to politics later in my career. I worked in health care. I spent ten years as a university professor.

Matt Flynn:

I was the chair of this party for four years, for two terms, retired our debt. We elected a Democratic governor and we elected Democratic majorities in the legislature.

Bob Harlow:

We all have a vision for a prosperous Wisconsin. And as governor, I will lead our state forward toward that vision.

Mahlon Mitchell:

I’ve been a firefighter for 20 years giving back to my community. As firefighters, we lead. We don't divide. We unite each other. We have one common goal and that is to help others.

Martha Laning:

The Republicans have spent all their time doing what's right for the wealthy and for giving handouts to corporations. It's time we bring politics back to the grass roots, to the people. That's what we're going to stand for. We're going to be out there talking about those issues. We already are. Our candidates are doing exactly that.

Mark Morgan:

I think the confidence that we derive is from the strength of our candidate and the strength of our message. You know, we're very confident in the fact that Governor Walker when he has the chance to lay out his reforms and lay out his message for the voters, it's a compelling message. When you get to talk about how the state has come back from where we were in 2010 and what his plan is to keep us moving forward. So that I think we're very confident in.

Frederica Freyberg:

Mordecai Lee says after his first term of shock and awe, campaign watchers should expect a continued play to the middle from Scott Walker.

Mordecai Lee:

I think his last budget was the least ideological budget in the sense of, yeah, he refused to increase the gas tax and it was a sop to the ideological purist, I'll never increase taxes. On the other hand, the main feature of that budget was he increased funding for public education, which is a very popular thing to do. I think what we're going to be seeing this time around is a governor running for reelection as a moderate Republican as opposed to as an ideological Tea Party Republican.

Martha Laning:

His agenda doesn't work. He was big and bold and made all kinds of promises. The job creation that he claimed he was going to make, he still hasn't delivered on that. It's seven years later.

Frederica Freyberg:

Though not making it a centerpiece of his campaign, Walker did sign the $3 billion deal on a potential 13,000 jobs with Foxconn, something Democrats call a reckless giveaway. Aside from the issues, Lee says personality plays a role.

Mordecai Lee:

What the Democrats need is somebody who's good on their feet, who's good verbally and who's got the discipline to only say what should be said and not start improvising or saying things on an ad hoc basis.

Mark Morgan:

Collectively, the biggest flaw all of them have is that they’re going to have to find some way to actually articulate a reason that people should vote for them.

Frederica Freyberg:

Articulating messages on both sides will be aided by a change in Wisconsin law that now means candidates of all stripes can coordinate with independent spending groups. And Mordecai Lee says with, “money being the mother's milk of politics, this change will open up the floodgates.”

Mordecai Lee:

This is so revolutionary in terms of its impact on Wisconsin politics, I think we're going to see the first $100 million campaign in Wisconsin. We're going to see wall-to-wall TV advertising. We're going to experience things we've never experienced before.

Frederica Freyberg:

So what can voters look for in this expansive list of challengers and the well-heeled incumbent? For that we turn to our 2018 political special panel, Republican lobbyist Bill McCoshen and Democratic activist Scot Ross. And thank you guys for being here.

Bill McCoshen and Scot Ross:

Thanks.

Frederica Freyberg:

So Bill, first to you: In keeping with what Mordecai Lee left us with, I guess we brace ourselves for this kind of wall-to-wall advertising, but do you suspect that will be negative advertising? Or will the incumbent, Scott Walker, kind of go kinder, gentler in keeping with his moderating tone and leave it to the outside groups to do the dirty work?

Bill McCoshen:

Depends on the time period. I think the governor's campaign will lay the case for why he should be re-elected between now and the Democratic primary in August, and after the primary, if he needs to draw a contrast with whomever comes out of that, I don't think he'll be bashful about doing that. He's got a history of campaigning to win. You can say a lot of things about Scott Walker. This guy's a proven winner, whether it's winning three times in Milwaukee County, heavily democrat Milwaukee County for county executive, or winning in 2010 or winning -- he's the only governor in the country to survive a recall. I mean, this guy wins.

Frederica Freyberg:

And so how does anybody who is challenging him go up against that?

Scot Ross:

Elections are snapshots in time. And where will the electorate be when it comes to November 2018, that's a big question. Scott Walker's had the benefit of two of his gubernatorial runs in 2010 and 2014, those were both wave elections for Republicans. Now Scott Walker does have a lot of tools at his disposal. He will have how much money he wants. It's as simple as that. He has unity amongst the Republican Party. They think he's doing a good job. The problem is that he still is in the mid-40s. On election day, he's been able to come across the finish line ahead, but we'll have to see, is the enthusiasm on the Democrat side? If the enthusiasm is actually on the Democrat side, it could be a long night for Scott Walker.

Frederica Freyberg:

What do you guys think about these projections of a $100 million election?

Bill McCoshen:

I think total between the gubernatorial and the U.S. Senate, it will be in excess of a hundred million.

Frederica Freyberg:

People are saying for the governor's race.

Bill McCoshen:

I don't know if there'll be that much just in the governor's race because I don't know that national Democrats view Walker as being that vulnerable yet, maybe they will at some point in time, but combined those two races will easily spend more than a hundred million.

Scot Ross:

Yeah, I think the Democratic side will have enough to compete. You don't have to have the most amount of money to win, but you have to have enough to compete all around the state in every single media market. I think we saw in 2016 when you don't compete statewide in every media market with television advertising, you sometimes don't win those elections.

Bill McCoshen:

Right.

Frederica Freyberg:

Scot, what do you think the unprecedented number of Democrats who want to be governor says about whether there is a clear frontrunner?

Scot Ross:

I don't think that there is a clear frontrunner. Not with that many candidates. What I will say is that the advantage that Scott Walker has in being an incumbent where he can go anywhere around the state and hold a press conference, not an interview, but he can hold a press conference and get wonderful coverage, you now have, what, 15 Democrats who are traveling around the state doing that, so all these areas of the state of Wisconsin where, you know, there's not a lot of Democratic members of the state legislature to articulate the problems with the Walker agenda. You're having these candidates who can go around and do that, and a lot of this, you know, earned media is something you can do every single day from now until the election.

Frederica Freyberg:

So you feel like there'll be trickle-down to legislative races in that way?

Scot Ross:

Well, I would be the last person to ever say trickle-down in terms of being a positive thing. I would say that synergy and having people talking about the issues is really, really important to organize people.

Frederica Freyberg:

To both of you, who could've been or would've been a clear frontrunner where you didn't have to have this entire body of primary people?

Bill McCoshen:

I think an outsider, a self-funder, you know, with business background would have been the Democrats' best hope, but I think there's probably three of them that have a path to get through this primary. I agree with Scot; I don't know that there's a particular person that's in the lead at this point in time. I mean, with 12 or 15 people in the race, you can win the primary with 15 percent. Tony Evers probably has a shot to get through this primary, Dana Wachs probably has a shot to get through this primary, and I would say that Mahlon Mitchell does too with the union support.

Frederica Freyberg:

You think?

Scot Ross:

What I think is that I've written enough primary election night concession speeches that in a 15-person race I'm not going to necessarily predict, but I do think that what the difference is, what the Democrats will have coming out of this is their all talking about essentially the same things when it comes to the visions that they see the direction Wisconsin needs to go, so there is going to be that sort of current going.

Frederica Freyberg:

We only have about a half a minute left in this segment where we're talking about the governor's race, but what do you think the Wisconsin voter wants to see in their next governor and in state government?

Bill McCoshen:

They want to see results. And that's why Walker has the distinct advantage in this. Promises made, promises kept. He's got a long list of them, the state's moving in the right direction.

Scot Ross:

They are tired of the division and he is the poster child for division in politics currently in Wisconsin.

Frederica Freyberg:

All right, we move along from the race for governor to a closer look at the 2018 U.S. Senate election. Incumbent Tammy Baldwin faces, among other challengers, State Senator Leah Vukmir. It's a race that is sure to be, in the words of UW Milwaukee political scientist Mordecai Lee, "a Donnybrook."

Mordecai Lee:

I think this is going to be the knock-down, drag-out fight we've never, ever experienced in Wisconsin. It's going to be unbelievable. It's going to be negative. It's going to be expensive. It's going to be hard to remember these are two individuals. You know, Tammy Baldwin was never thought of as a strong politician when she was willing to give up her seat in Congress, in Madison, and run for statewide office. There had never been somebody who had declared their sexual preference, who was not heterosexual who had won a statewide election. And so it was assumed that she was the underdog against Tommy Thompson, who everybody knew, who appealed to the middle, and yet she pulled off a brilliant victory with one ad, the ad that said "He's not for you anymore." In other words, Tommy Thompson is not the person you voted for. So I think it's important not to underrate her political skills, because she really showed her chops in that first election. But because this is an off-year election that skews Republican, I think she's got an uphill battle. But nonetheless, both sides are mobilized. We're already seeing TV ads and hearing radio ads, so I think this is going to be the Donnybrook of all political fights we've ever seen in Wisconsin.

Frederica Freyberg:

So, Scot, do you think it's going to be "the Donnybrook" of all political fights in Wisconsin?"

Scot Ross:

Yeah, I think both the primary and the general are going to be incredibly competitive. I think Tammy has advantage in the general, which is fundraising. She's got amazing fundraising prowess. The base of Wisconsin's Democratic electorate absolutely loves her, and she ain't responsible for any of the garbage that's going on in Congress currently whereas things like that tax break, you know, that just passed that is so wildly unpopular, both of the Republican candidates for Senate have embraced it fully. It is a big fight. You've got Dick Uihlein versus Diane Hendricks, and which billionaire will prevail, right?

Frederica Freyberg:

You think so, too?

Bill McCoshen:

Yeah, it's hard to imagine any race being more dramatic than the recall in 2012 for governor, but this one's going to be close. It will be $50, $60, $70 million in mostly out-of-state money coming' in here. Tammy Baldwin's a top ten target by the Republican National Senatorial Committee. She's not number one, but she is in the top ten. She did beat my former boss, Tommy Thompson, largely because western Wisconsin was really strong for her, but remember, that's Trump country now. That's changed a lot. We've had three-- it doesn't happen often-- but we've had three incumbents ousted in the state of Wisconsin: Gaylord Nelson in 1980, Bob Kasten in 1992, Russ Feingold in 2010,  so it has happened in off-year elections, so don't rule out the possibility that a Republican could win this seat.

Scot Ross:

One thing about western Wisconsin is that it wasn't competed for by Democrats. Ron Kind didn't have a race, so there was no message saying, "Hey, what's going on in Washington D.C. under Barack Obama's-- actually success?" There wasn't any TV went it came to, you know, the Clinton campaign. There was no TV with Sean Duffy, so that didn't exist in this. I think the big thing here is, how are the Republicans going to come together after this primary, which is going to nasty because the way Leah Vukmir wins is she starts putting up ads saying Kevin Nicholson is a Democrat, here's him speaking at the DNC, and I don't know how you outspend to win that.

Bill McCoshen:

There's no question Leah is the favorite in that race. She's got a record, and Scot thinks it's an accomplishment for Tammy Baldwin, I think it's a negative that she's not part of the mess in D.C. She doesn't have a record of accomplishment in her six years there, and Leah Vukmir does, and I think that will be the greatest contrast in the fall election is a lady that gets stuff done and one that doesn't get much done.

Frederica Freyberg:

Well Republican candidates are using her opposition, as we've discussed, to the new tax cuts against her, but I read this from Tommy Thompson with interest, saying that people where he's from in Juno County, he says, "A business tax cut from 39 percent to 22 percent doesn't mean jack to them." How true is that?

Bill McCoshen:

Well, I think it's true right now. I think the Republicans have done a horrible job of selling this thing. The good news for Republicans is folks should start to see these tax breaks on their February, you know, checks, so that's -- by the time the election rolls around in November, they will have ten months of tax cuts that Tammy Baldwin's going to have to defend voting no against, and the Republican, again, I think it will be Vukmir, will be able to be on the attack.

Frederica Freyberg:

You can't wait to be able to get in on this.

Scot Ross:

Yes, Dick Uihlein and Diane Hendricks, the billionaire Republicans, will get their tax breaks, that's for sure. My real interest is what happened this week, which was that the Club for Growth came out against attacking Leah Vukmir, and do you know what they attacked her for? Voting for $87 million in tax increases because she supported Scott Walker's budget in 2011.

Bill McCoshen:

This is the club for un-growth. They supported Mark Neumann against Scott Walker in 2010. They supported Eric Hovde against Tommy Thompson. And now they're supporting a former Democrat, Kevin Nicholson, against Leah Vukmir. They have no relevance in the state of Wisconsin.

Frederica Freyberg:

Wow, well, you're hear from them.

Bill McCoshen:

More than likely; that's okay.

Frederica Freyberg:

Well, I can see that this race is already getting people fired up, namely you guys.

Scot Ross:

This is our opportunity to-- I think it's Democrats' opportunity to be able to talk about the bad stuff that's going on, to connect folks to what's going on with Trump at the federal level, and you know, again, with Tammy, she's got one of the premiere pieces of the Affordable Care Act puzzle, which is allowing people under 26 to stay on their parents' healthcare. It is wildly unpopular what the Republicans are doing with the Affordable Care Act.

Bill McCoshen:

Having been on the other side of Tammy with Tommy in 2012, I will say that she's really smart, she works very hard, and she'll have a ton of money, and for Democrats, the good news for them is, she brings out the base, no question about that.

Frederica Freyberg:

All right, well, stay with us because we're going into our next segment. We asked our panelists to come with their choice of a topic to watch for 2018. Bill McCoshen asked, "Can the GOP maintain a ‘Red Wall’ in order to keep the governorship, attorney general, and majorities in both houses of the legislature?” So that's what you want to ask.

Bill McCoshen:

So the question is, can we maintain majorities in both houses, large majorities, and the governorship, the attorney general while there could potentially be a wave against Republicans nationally? And I don't think New Jersey and Virginia are very good signals of what could happen here, but there does, there are some seeds planted out there that it looks like it'll be a decent year for Democrats in 2018. And some of that is historic. It's baked into the cake. Over the course of time, 93 percent of elections in off years, the party in charge of the White House has lost seats in the Congress, and 73 percent of the times they've lost seats in the Senate. So it's inevitable that Republicans are likely to lose some seats. Does one house flip or the other? Hard to say at this point, but Democrats have a lot to be encouraged about. For Wisconsin Republicans, I think they have to continue to send their message, sell their message of results, getting things done. Time after time after time that's been proven to be a successful formula for Scott Walker. It's proven to be a successful formula for Republicans on the ground either for the state Senate or the state Assembly. They get stuff done and voters respond to that.

Frederica Freyberg:

Scot, do you think that Republicans can maintain what Bill calls a “Red Wall”?

Scot Ross:

I think the Republicans have done a lot to try and maintain that “Red Wall.” I think there's been a lot of rigging when it comes to voting rights, when it comes to redistricting, when it comes to some of the policies they have enacted in terms of ethics and such. What I think, though, is Wisconsin, we haven't had a wave election in an off year since 2006 and in 2006, Jim Doyle won huge. The state Assembly picked up seven or eight seats, the state Senate was flipping all from Republican to Democratic, so in a wave election year, you know, anything can happen.

Frederica Freyberg:

Is this as much about kind of what might have happened in other states and Democrats feeling positive, or does it come down to the individual candidates?

Bill McCoshen:

It has a lot to do with it. I mean, at the end of the day, if there are any Republicans at risk in Wisconsin in 2018, the most at risk would be the congressional delegation. They did get the tax thing done. It does have a piece of the Obamacare repeal. They got rid of the individual mandate, but they have to continue to put their foot on the gas and get things done in 2018 if they want to solidify their position for re-election.

Scot Ross:

I was going to say, how do the-- here's the question, how do Republicans decouple themselves from Donald Trump, who's incredibly unpopular? They can't do that. I mean Scott Walker has embraced him. Leah Vukmir's embraced him. Kevin Nicholson's embraced him. The stage legis aren't going to suddenly come out and say he's terrible. And as on Friday we saw a CNN poll that said really to Congress that a generic Democrat is up 18 points to the Republicans. Those are historic numbers. Now, that's where we're at right now. Can things change? I don't know. Donald Trump's not going to suddenly become more tolerable. He's not going to become less animated on Twitter, and so how do they overcome that?

Frederica Freyberg:

Do you feel like any of the really low favorability numbers for Donald Trump translate all the way down to legislative races?

Bill McCoshen:

It does, yeah, history has shown that if the president's approval numbers, whether it's Obama or Bush or the previous Bush, are low heading into a midterm election, they lose a lot of seats.

Frederica Freyberg:

What about Scott Walker? I mean, what an interesting place he's in. First he very much opposed Donald Trump, as we saw when he made his speech dropping out, then he's supportive; where is he now?

Bill McCoshen:

I think he and Paul Ryan have been able to find the sweet spot. They don't respond to everything the president does. They don't defend every Tweet he puts out. They don't defend every statement he makes. Everything he does that's provocative, they sort of walk the other way, and I think that's a smart strategy on their part.

Frederica Freyberg:

What do you think?

Scot Ross:

I think that once there's more scrutiny on the day-to-day operations related to campaigns that they're going to have a problem with it because they're just not really getting asked about it all the time. But every time Donald Trump does something bad once we're firmly in 2018 campaign season, Scott Walker whether he wants to or not is going to have to respond to it. And if he doesn't respond to it, the Republican Party, because there are reporters all across the state that are going to demand answers.

Bill McCoshen:

Where he can be most helpful, actually, is on the fundraising side, whether it's for Leah Vukmir if I'm right about that Senate primary or Scott Walker, he can come and raise $5 million in one lunch.

Frederica Freyberg:

All right, Scot Ross's topic to watch also comes in the form of a question. "Will Democrats finally embrace an economic agenda that addresses the needs of the nation's 120 million post-Boomers?" You are really on this topic. Are you not feeling the love?

Scot Ross:

Well, I'm simply saying that for the last 25 years, the economic message that's germinated out of Washington D.C. for Democrats is Social Security, Medicare, my employer-provided pension is under assault, all critically important issues, but for those of us under the age of 50, and I'll still thankfully there, it doesn't do anything related to my day-to-day life. We as post-Boomers have a totally different economic situation than our parents or our grandparents had, and the economic message of Democrats has not reflected that. Need to have a very positive agenda, especially when you're talking about Scott Walker, cause you're not going to beat Scott Walker by just saying he's going to make Wisconsin worse. You will beat Scott Walker by saying you'll make Wisconsin better.

Frederica Freyberg:

Don't the politicians appeal to voters of a certain age, though, because they vote?

Scot Ross:

Say you're talking about Generation X. You're talking about 40 million voters between the ages of about 51, 52 and 35. This is a huge voting block that are not kids anymore, I mean, I don't consider myself a child anymore. I care about childcare. I care about family medical leave. I care about how am I going to-- my retirement is on my own. All those types of issues, student loan debt, you know that's literally probably the biggest economic issue for post-Boomers because there's $1.4 trillion worth of it. 85% of it is held by people under the age of 50.

Bill McCoshen:

Now Bill, Scott Walker is talking jobs and training ads at millennials to come back to Wisconsin. Is that appealing in the way that Scot is talking about Democrats ought to be?

Bill McCoshen:

I think it's very appealing. I mean, the economic statistics, people vote their pocket books first, and we've had that conversation here on this program in the past. That's in Walker's favor, whether it's more people working than ever before, the lowest unemployment rate in 17 years, or bringing in new company after new company. Those are things that resonate with people. They see that good, positive energy come into the state of Wisconsin and now, as you just pointed out, he's advertising to bring people back. If you have any interest in finding real strong, meaningful employment, come to that state of Wisconsin. That's a new message for the state of Wisconsin, and I think that's going to be to his benefit.

Frederica Freyberg:

What do you think of that message of trying to lure people back here?

Scot Ross:

I think that when you give $4.5 billion to a Taiwanese billionaire to provide jobs for people to cross the Illinois border, it's not the cornerstone of an election victory. Scott Walker does have an advantage in terms of his age, currently. You know, where he's at a lot of the leaders in the Republican side are Gen Xers, that's for sure, but if you think about history, the last 100 years the ages of non-incumbent Democrats elected president are 52, 51, 47, 46, and 43, which means 2020's best thing for the Democrats would be somebody between 1977 and 1968 born. We have that.

Frederica Freyberg:

Do you see any of the Democratic candidates embracing younger voters or their issues?

Scot Ross:

Oh, absolutely. Yes, no matter their age, they're all talking about those important issues, student loan debt.

Bill McCoshen:

And they’re all old. We'll agree on that, right?

Scot Ross:

There are some of them who are seasoned. But there are also ones that are younger than I am, so I think that's where they are talking about a lot of those critically important issues. Can they stay disciplined? I mean, that's the thing with Scott Walker. In 2010 when he ran, if you copied everything that Scott Walker had on his website for issues, it's a page and a quarter long. You just have to be message-disciplined. Figure out the things that make your base voters go out and vote, and then talk to them about it.

Frederica Freyberg:

Very briefly, the universal issues that every demographic cares about?

Bill McCoshen:

Jobs is number one, without question, and Walker's got the distinct advantage on that going forward, and I don't know how a Democrat, regardless of who comes through the primary, can draw that contrast with him on economic issues.

Scot Ross:

People all across Wisconsin who don't have jobs are going to have a problem with that. I think that it's quality of life. Are you working one job that gets you to pay for the bills for your family, and currently in Walker's economy, that's not the case. He's been in charge for seven years. If you're unhappy about anything, it's his fault, and he's going to pay the price for that.

Frederica Freyberg:

We leave it there. Scot Ross, Bill McCoshen, thanks very much and have a great new year.

Scot Ross, Bill McCoshen:

You too.

Frederica Freyberg:

Next week we continue our interviews with candidates running for state Supreme Court. Judge Rebecca Dallet will join us. I'm Frederica Freyberg. Have a safe and happy new year.

Announcer:

Funding for “Here and Now” is provided in part by Friends of Wisconsin Public Television.    

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