Closer Look: Spanish Language Radio Station Speaks Out | Wisconsin Public Television

Closer Look: Spanish Language Radio Station Speaks Out

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Premiere Date: 
March 3, 2017

Closer Look: Spanish Language Radio Station Speaks Out

La Movida is the state's first Spanish language radio station, and they're looking to educate Madison's Hispanic community about what's going on. The husband and wife who run the station say they're looking to debunk rumors and calm the fears of many undocumented immigrants in the community. They've been talking to local law enforcement and public officials about the reality of the current situation.

Episode Transcript

Frederica Freyberg:

We move now to a "Closer Look" at what stricter enforcement of immigration policies may mean in Wisconsin. With immigration enforcement being emphasized by the new administration many Latinos are concerned about possible deportation and many are letting their voices and concerns be heard. Reporter Andy Soth spent some time at Wisconsin’s first Spanish language radio station to hear what's being talked about.

Andy Soth:

At Midwest Family Broadcasting's Madison headquarters, a walk down the hall is like scanning the radio dial. At the end of the hall you'll find La Movida, Wisconsin's first and still Madison’s only Spanish language station. The station is run by husband and wife Louise and Lupita Montoto.

[spanish being spoken]

Lupita Montoto:

We're so different and unique compared to the other radio stations. We have pretty much everything combined in one station.

Andy Soth:

That means morning talk shows and music all day long. While songs remain the same, with the change in administration and immigration policy the talk has turned very serious.

Donald Trump:

For that reason we will soon begin the construction of a great, great wall along our southern border.

Louise Montoto:

Our community lives in fear in regards to deportations and what law enforcement is going to be doing. What is your stance?

Joe Parisi:

I don't believe that local law enforcement should be used as immigration enforcement.

Andy Soth:

Dane County Executive Joe Parisi is on this morning with a Spanish translator.

Lupita Montoto:

We have so many callers saying. "What are you going to do? Are they going to deport everyone? My kids were born here."

Louise Montoto:

It's difficult to see a grown man cry from fear and the unknown on what's going to happen to his family.

Andy Soth:

The Montotos can't offer certainty but do try to provide their Latino listeners with useful information.

Lupita Montoto:

We are the vehicle, the bridge that connects the non-Latino community with the Latino community and vice versa.

Andy Soth:

That includes a Facebook Live feed when Madison Police Chief Mike Koval is in studio.

Mike Koval:

We're not going to arrest

[spanish translation]

and we are not going to charge

[spanish translation]

anyone for just being undocumented.

Louise Montoto:

There is a lot of rumors out there. And that's one of the things that we as a station have to fight.

Louise Montoto:

I’m getting a question. Do you know anything about immigration or ICE in Middleton yesterday?

Mike Koval:

Not a thing. No.

Andy Soth:

While local officials offer reassurance, the federal government's response is much less certain.

Louise Montoto:

There is a lot of fear in the Latino community in regards to the U.S. government right now. We live difficult times right now.

Andy Soth:

The times may be difficult, but there is no better time for La Movida to be serving its growing audience.

[spanish being spoken]

Lupita Montoto:

Today the things are not in the best perspective and the best interest of the Latinos or the immigrants but there's always a way to continue working hard and having the hope that tomorrow will be a better day.

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