Science/Nature

Teaching Math & Science to Early Learners

Rosemarie Truglio, Senior Vice President, Education & Research, Sesame Workshop; Rachel Connolly, Director of Education, NOVA; Anita Wager, Assistant Professor, School of Education, UW–Madison; and Edward Hubbard Assistant Professor, School of Education, UW-Madison join moderator Michael Harryman, Wisconsin Public Television, to discuss how to teach preschoolers math and science concepts.

The History and Science of Meat

Jeff Sindelar, Associate Professor, Department of Animal Sciences, UW-Madison, carves into the history of meat processing from ancient Roman times to present day, highlighting ways the industry developed in Wisconsin over the past 150 years.

Brain Science and the Military

Jonathan D. Moreno, Professor, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, explores initiatives that are changing the course of modern warfare. Moreno addresses ways the intelligence communities and university science departments work together to prepare military personnel.

Climate Science, Populism, and the Democracy of Rejection

Mark Brown, Professor, Department of Government, California State University, Sacramento, delves into the popular distrust of climate science and its relationship to suspicion of both organized power and democracy.

The Legacy of Ice-Age Winds, Forest and Prairie

Joseph Mason, Professor, Department of Geography, UW-Madison, discusses naturalist John Muir’s walk from Madison to the Muir family farm in upper Marquette County in the 1860s. Mason highlights the changes in terrain, at that time, from rolling prairie in DeForest to wetlands in Poynette to forest in Ennis Lake.

Managing Your Lawn the Wisconsin Way

Doug Soldat, Associate Professor, Dept of Soil Science, UW-Madison, discusses how to grow a functional lawn while reducing the environmental impact. Soldat explains how to choose the best type of grass for your site and how to improve your soil. He also explores ways to help your lawn recover from the extreme heat and drought of 2012.

Issues in Genetic Engineering & Food

Tom Zinnen, Biotechnology Specialist, UW-Madison & UW-Extension, discusses how genetic engineering can create disease-resistant crops. Zinnen talks about citrus greening, a disease that is ravaging orange orchards around the world, and how genetic engineering is providing ways to control it, and genetically engineered Golden Rice, which by adding Vitamin A, can help to reduce cases of blindness.

Computer Simulation and Engineers

Dan Negrut, Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical Engineering, UW-Madison, explores ways that computers are being used by mechanical engineers to understand the behavior of complex systems by using computer simulations.

The Great Peshtigo Fire

Scott Knickelbine, author of “The Great Peshtigo Fire: Stories and Science from America’s Deadliest Fire”, shares the history and relevance of the Great Peshtigo fire. The forestry and agriculture in Peshtigo, together with unusual environmental factors in 1817, come together to create this Wisconsin disaster.

Sinkholes

David Hart, hydrogeologist and geophysicist for the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey, explores Wisconsin’s relatively small sinkholes; how they form, why they occur and how to deal with them.

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