Science/Nature

Hunting Wild Yeast in Patagonia – Ep. 682

Chris Hittinger, an assistant professor in the Department of Genetics at UW-Madison, discusses a recently discovered yeast in the Andean forests of Patagonia, Argentina. The yeast, Saccharomyces eubayanus, fused with a S. cerevisiae ale yeast and evolved into the modern lager yeast that brewers use around the world.

Vanilla, Orchids and Evolution - Ep. 680

Ken Cameron, an associate professor in the Botany Department at UW-Madison and the director of the Wisconsin State Herbarium, presents an overview of the evolution, relationships, identity, and natural history of Vanilla orchids and other related orchids.

Teaching Children and Youth with Autism – Ep.677

Linda Tuchman-Ginsberg, the program director at the Waisman Center Early Intervention Program at UW-Madison, discusses evidence-based practices within a child's daily routines and activities as the best approach to serving children and youth with ASD. Tuchman-Ginsberg provides a brief overview of the National Professional Development Center on Autism Spectrum Disorders and resources they provide.

Intervention for Adolescents with ASD - Ep. 675

Leann Smith, an associate scientist at the Waisman Center at the UW-Madison, focuses on recent research on the needs of families undergoing transition and will present data from a pilot study of the Transitioning Together program, an education and support program for families of adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) that is being provided at the Waisman Center.

Aspergillus Can Kill Us…or Thrill Us – Ep.672

Nancy Keller, a professor of Medical Microbiology and Immunology at UW-Madison, introduces Aspergillus, a genus of fungi, well known to human kind due to the inclusion of harmful pathogens, industrial workhorses, food and beverage microbes and genetic models. This genus of fungus is known for its production of biologically active natural products that are either harmful or helpful to humankind.

Nanogenerators – Ep. 669

Xudong Wang, an assistant professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the UW- Madison, talks about how the recent development of nanogenerators has demonstrated a promising solution for the design of self-sufficient implantable power source.

Darwin's Tree of Life – Ep. 668

David Baum, a professor in the Department of Botany at UW-Madison, discusses Charles Darwin’s concept of common ancestry related to the idea of the “The Tree of Life.” While biologists have accepted the validity of common ancestry for one hundred and fifty years, the full implications of the tree framework have only become clear in the last few decades.

A Global Approach to Non-communicable Diseases - Ep. 666

Dr. Jim Cleary, an associate professor at the UW-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, discusses diseases and health care within the global community. Cleary examines health care around the world and focuses on palliative care for cancer patients.

Cranberries - Ep. 661

Brent McCown, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Horticulture at UW-Madison, explores the current economic situation for cranberry growers and charts out the needs of the industry. He describes UW-Madison research collaborations with growers to discover and test new ways to grow cranberries better, as well as to find new genetic approaches to grow better cranberries.

The Discovery of Bat White-Nose Syndrome - Ep. 562

David Blehert, PhD., Microbiologist at the USGS - National Wildlife Health Center, highlights the discovery and progression of the Bat White-Nose Syndrome in the United States. Blehert discusses the studies taking place at the NWHC to determine how the fungus is transmitted from an infected bat to a healthy bat.

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