Science/Nature

Neanderthals Are Us - Ep. 460

John Hawks, Assistant Professor, Department of Anthropology, UW-Madison.

John Hawks explores the existence and disappearance of the Neanderthal during the course of human evolution. He also explains the anatomical difference between Neanderthals and Homo sapiens.

How to Increase our Healthy Cognitive Lifespan - Ep. 456

Craig Atwood, PhD, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Medicine - Geriatrics; UW-Madison.

Craig Atwood discusses age-related dementia, including its stages, symptoms and causes. He also goes on to describe ways researchers are now trying to help halt this and other types of cognitive decline.

A Decade of Lameness Research in Dairy Cows at the UW-SVM...

Nigel Cook, Associate Professor, School of Veterinary Medicine, UW-Madison.

Nigel Cook discusses the issue of lameness on dairy farms, a disease he says must remain under control in order to maintain the success of one of Wisconsin's largest industries. He also looks at ways to prevent and treat this problem.

Sustainable Thinking in an Age of Energy Challenges - Ep....

Mike Dalecki, PhD, Dept. of Sociology, UW-Platteville.

Mike Dalecki offers new ways to look at our usage of energy, focusing on the lenses of sociology, economics and history.

Understanding Public Attitudes Toward Controversial...

Dominique Brossard, Associate Professor, Department of Life Sciences Communication, UW-Madison.

Dominique Brossard asserts that the lack of support for science and scientific innovations can be traced to attitudes toward technology, lack of knowledge on the part of the lay person, the institutions and people providing information and media coverage.

Chasing Ghosts: Risk, Resilience, and Disaster in...

Rick Keller, Associate Professor, Department of Medical History and Bioethics, UW-Madison

Professor Rick Keller takes a deeper look into the extraordinary heat was that hit central Europe, most specifically France, in August of 2003. The daytime highs were 105-120 degrees Fahrenheit. The problem was nighttime lows were still as high as 70 degrees Fahrenheit, resulting in death and destruction.

Primate Communication - Ep. 410

Chuck Snowdon, Professor, Department of Psychology, UW-Madison

Professor Snowdon discusses his research of cotton top tamarin monkeys. He explains the biology of breding then the feeding behaviors and learnign of infant monkeys. Lastly he talks about his collaboration with musician David Teie to test music's effects on the emotoins of a species that has never been exposed to music before.

The Physics of Sports - Ep. 481

Clint Sprott, professor, Department of Physics, UW-Madison

Clint Sprott recruits a number of sports-minded physicists and audience members to help explain the application of mathematics to athletic activities like judo, bowling and figure skating.

Crop Diversity: An Example from the Andes - Ep. 403

Eve Emshwiller, Assistant Professor of Botany, UW-Madison

Eve Emshwiller explains why there should be a concern about crop plant diversity and tells of the things that can be done to support more diversity. She incorporates her research done on the tuber crop which is located in the Andes of South America as she studies the relationship between human interactions and plants.

Environmental Change in Northern China - Ep. 395

Joe Mason, Professor, Department of Geography, UW-Madison

Professor Joe Mason speaks about his research, as well as collaborative projects, regarding northern China's deserts. More specifically, he discusses the research done four to five years ago on the environmental changes in the deserts between China and Mongolia.

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