Science/Nature

The Science and Art of Making Sausage – Ep. 722

Jeff Sindelar, an assistant professor of Animal Sciences at UW-Madison, demonstrates and explains the important scientific principles of sausage (bratwurst and summer sausage) manufacturing while intertwining the history and art associated with these products.

Relearning to Balance After Stroke or Brain Injury – Ep. 720

Beth Meyerand, a professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at UW-Madison, introduces a device that uses electrical stimulation via the tongue to induce a sustained behavioral improvement in balance in patient populations that have balance dysfunction.

Connecting Scientists & Lifelong Learners - Ep. 717

Dennis Schatz, senior vice president at the Pacific Science Center in Seattle, WA, talks about the Portal to the Public, which connects research scientists and science based professionals, to public audiences. The project, funded by the National Science Foundation, focuses on lifelong learning in the scientific fields.

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Monkey Research – Ep. 715

David Abbott, a professor at the Wisconsin National Primate Research Center at UW-Madison, discusses the science and the animal procedures involved in identifying Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in young women. Dr. Abbott, working with a team of scientists from several disciplines, identified fetal origins for this disease in monkeys, and suggested that it may be linked with a specific gene in humans.

Wisconsin’s Driftless Region - Ep. 705

Eric Carson, an assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at UW-Extension, shares his research of the Driftless Area of southwest Wisconsin--known for its unique lack of glacial deposits. The landscape of the Driftless Area owes its form to long-term erosion by stream systems that have incised into the Paleozoic bedrock.

An Early Cahokian Colony in Wisconsin – Ep. 702

Danielle Benden, academic curator in the Department of Anthropology at UW-Madison, explores the mystery behind a 1000-year-old mission site in the Village of Trempealeau, Wisconsin. Colonists, called Mississippian peoples by archaeologists, arrived from America’s first city, Cahokia, near modern day St. Louis, Missouri, 750 miles away, in dugout canoes.

The Great Japan Earthquake and Tsunami of 2011 – Ep. 698

Harold Tobin, a professor in the Department of Geoscience at UW-Madison, discusses the March 11, 2011 earthquake and trans-Pacific tsunami, the causes and history of these mega-earthquakes, and what took place beneath the waves. Tobin explores how the tsunami warning system worked and how this event triggered a reassessment of the hazard presented by such undersea faults around the world.

Physics of the Wisconsin Idea - Ep. 718

Clint Sprott, joined by his colleagues in the Department of Physics at UW-Madison, demonstrates how physics work in everyday life. The themes of the experiments are based on the Wisconsin Idea and “The Wizard of Oz.”

The John Steuart Curry Murals – Ep. 695

Dave Nelson, a professor in the Department of Biochemistry at UW-Madison, and Lauren Kroiz, an assistant professor in the Department of Art History at UW-Madison, discuss the John Steuart Curry mural “The Social Benefits of Research in Biochemistry” which depicts discoveries by researchers Stephen Babcock, E.B. Hart, Harry Steenbock, and E.V. McCollum.

Improving Health Care Services in Ethiopia - Ep. 691

Lori DiPrete Brown, Roman Aydiko, and Sweta Shrestha from the Global Health Institute and Katie Konkle from the Population Health Institute at UW-Madison, discuss the innovations and programs instituted to improve health care in Ethiopia. The quality improvement methods they are focusing on include meeting critical needs, using a twinning model, and expanding programs already in effect.

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