Science/Nature

Personhood & Near-Personhood - Ep. 576

Gary Varner, a professor in the Department of Philosophy at Texas A&M University, discusses the basis of moral status, personhood, and near-personhood, in relation to animal research.

The Physics of Yoga - Ep. 575

James Reardon, Associate Faculty in the Dept. of Physics at UW Madison, puzzles over the yoga phrases: balance, integrity of the pose, work within the pose and the term he finds especially mysterious, press your feet into the floor. He explains their meaning in relationship to the physical concepts of mass, force, and gravity.

The Cotton-Top Tamarin - Ep. 573

Charles Snowdon, a professor in the Psychology Dept. at UW-Madison discusses the habits of the cotton-top tamarin, a South American primate. Snowdon explains his research techniques which include a non-invasive study of the animals.

HIV/AIDS Education Across Uganda - Ep. 570

Melissa Breunig, a student in the Dept. of Genetics at UW-Madison, reports on her recent experience visiting hospitals and health care centers in Uganda. Breunig discusses the ways HIV and AIDS patients are diagnosed, educated and treated in different parts of the country.

Do Older Elephants Ever Forget? Aging, Memory and the...

Hilary Gerstein, a research assistant in the Neuroscience Training Program at UW-Madison, explains her research into the function of certain genes in the hippocampus that have been implicated in learning and memory.

The Centennial Study of Concrete - Ep. 557

Steve Cramer, professor and associate dean of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at UW-Madison, discusses the longest-running university concrete research project in the country. The project began at UW-Madison in 1910 by Owen Withey. Intended to last ten years, the study has continued for a century.

Ethics and Efficacy of Experimentation on Animals - Ep. 556

Lawrence Hansen, a professor at the University of California-San Diego, focuses on the ethics of using animals for research. Hansen questions whether experimentation produces the desired results and whether the end justifies the means.

The Beaver Dam Eye Study - Ep.555

Barbara E.K. Klein MD, a professor in the Department of Population Health Sciences at UW-Madison, shares her research into the prevalence and incidence of age-related cataract, macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy, common eye diseases in an aging population.

Explorations in Chocolate - Ep. 552

Rich Hartel, a professor in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at UW-Madison, examines how food scientists characterize and then tune the properties of melted chocolate to best fit different applications, from enrobing candy bars to forming drops and molding pieces. Delve into how melted chocolate is tempered to ensure it properly turns solid when cooled.

Maple Syrup Education - Ep. 547

Ruth Ann Lee, an educator at the Mackenzie Environmental Education Center in Poynette, WI, discusses Sisibaskwat, or time of the melting snow--better known as maple sugaring time. Lee explains what makes this a successful environmental education program for the Center, which hosts thousands of school kids annually to celebrate spring.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Science/Nature