Science/Nature

Chemistry Imagined: Connecting Art and Science

Roald Hoffmann, Professor Emeritus, Dept. of Chemistry, Cornell University, and Vivian Torrence, Visual Artist, discuss their collaboration which produced a book filled with stories, poetry, essays and painted collages that stress the social, literary and psychological aspects of chemistry. Steve Paulson from Wisconsin Public Radio directs a discussion about this intersection of art and science.

Alzheimer's Disease in Adults with Down Syndrome

Brad Christian, Associate Professor, Medical Physics, UW-Madison, explores the relationship between adults who have Down Syndrome and the extremely high risk factor they have of developing Alzheimer’s Disease.

Health Supervision for Children with Down Syndrome

Katie Williams, Pediatric Resident, Medical School, UW-Madison, discusses the updated American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) health supervision guidelines for the care of children with Down Syndrome. Revised in 2011, the AAP offers guidance for primary care providers in caring for these medically complex children.

Using Human Stem Cells to Study Down Syndrome

Anita Bhattacharyya, Senior Scientist, Waisman Center, UW-Madison, explores how Down syndrome stem cells make brain cells can explain specific deficits and can ultimately lead to better treatments for those with Down syndrome.

Virus Takeover of Host Cell Functions

Paul Ahlquist, Lead Scientist, Virology, Morgridge Institute, UW-Madison, outlines how identifying and studying virus-host interactions provides major insight into both infection and normal cellular functions. Host genes required by viruses also offer opportunities for improved control strategies to provide longer-lasting and potentially broader spectrum antiviral protection.

50 years of Newborn Screening

Charles Brokopp, Director, Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, offers the history of screening newborns which began 50 years ago with testing for PKU, phenylketonuria. Newborn babies in Wisconsin are now screened for more than 40 disorders with early detection saving lives, improving quality of life and cutting health care costs.

High Throughput DNA Sequencing

Joshua Hyman, Director, UW Biotechnology Center Sequencing Facility, offers an overview of the technologies behind high throughput DNA sequencing and explores the impacts of this knowing this on our health, on environment and the food we eat.

Science is Sexy

Ira Flatow, Host, Science Friday, National Public Radio, explains why science is sexy. New studies show that people get their science education through entertainment, whether that's a trip to the museum or a “Big Bang Theory” marathon. Flatow explores ways science is popping up throughout pop culture, proving that despite what people think, science is, in fact, sexy.

The Neuroscience of Addiction

Brenda del Moral, Assistant Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Edgewood College, presents a multi-leveled, systems approach to addiction and how it affects the whole organism--down to the molecular level. Del Moral describes the criteria needed to diagnose a person with the disease of addiction.

IceCube Winterover in the South Pole

Freija Descamps, Postdoctoral Researcher, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, recounts her adventures operating and maintaining the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the South Pole. Descamps spent thirteen months, including a long, dark winter, working at the biggest and strangest telescope in the world.

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