Politics/Law

Media Campaigns and Socioeconomic Disparities

Jeffrey Niederdeppe, PhD, UW School of Medicine and Public Health, discusses media campaigns and socioeconomic disparities in health behaviors. He looks at a case study of smoking cessation, the different responses to media messages in Wisconsin, and his new research project which tries to develop narratives and images for population health messaging.

The Story of Wisconsin's Partial Veto Power

Fred Wade, Attorney, talks about the Frankenstein veto, which is the power of the governor to use his partial veto power in a way that allows him to make laws that were not originally approved by the legislature. Fred discusses the contradiction this posses and looks into the history of Wisconsin's state constitution.

African American Degree Attainment and The Nation's Big Goal

Dr. James Minor, Senior Program Officer, Southern Education Foundation, discusses the correlation
between the level of education
and quality of life, especially relating to the African American and Latino communities.
Dr. Damon Williams and Dr. Jerlando Jackson join in a panel discussion.

Religion, Education and the International Political Economy

Amy Stambach, Educational Policy Studies, UW Madison, discusses the role of American Evangelical missions in Africa. The first decade of the 21st century marks a high point in missionary involvement in international development work.

The Principled Politician: A Story of Courage - Ep. 699

Adam Schrager, a producer at Wisconsin Public Television, tells the story of Ralph Carr who was drafted to run for governor of Colorado in 1938. Carr became a national figure when he defended the Constitutional rights of Japanese-Americans after Pearl Harbor. His outspoken and unpopular stance would cost him greatly, both personally and professionally.

The Euro Crisis: Greece, Ireland, and the Future of the...

Mark Copelovitch, an assistant professor in the Department of Political Science at UW-Madison, explores the sustainability of a single currency in Europe. He discusses what keeping the eurozone together might entail and whether it is economically and politically sustainable.

"Sustainable Growth" is an Oxymoron - Ep. 659

Rudy Baum, editor-in-chief of Chemical & Engineering News, looks at fossil fuels and their impact on climate and society. Baum contends that it is up to scientists to lead through research and innovation and through moral suasion.

A Conversation with Gwen Ifill - Ep. 651

Gwen Ifill, the moderator and managing editor of "Washington Week" shares her journey beginning as a newspaper reporter to her present job at PBS. Ifill talks about her mentor, Tim Russert, her tried and true means to get a comment for a story and her work at PBS.

Voices of Labor and Social Justice in Wisconsin - Ep. 642

Bruce Mouser, Professor Emeritus in the Department of History at UW-LaCrosse, and Paul Boyer Professor Emeritus in the Department of History at UW-Madison, introduce two powerful voices from the 19th century in this look at the deep roots of labor activism and social justice in Wisconsin. Mouser focuses on George Edwin Taylor while Boyer explores Robert Koehler's painting, "The Strike."

Has American Politics Betrayed the Middle Class? - Ep. 641

Jacob Hacker, a professor in the Department of Political Science at Yale University, explores the effects of the economic crisis and offers solutions for building a democracy that serves the interest of more Americans.

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