Politics/Law

Politics/Law

Ethiopia’s Grand Dam Plan

Paul Block, Assistant Professor, College of Engineering, UW-Madison, explores the implications of the construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, GERD, and the streamflow reductions to the upstream countries of Sudan and Egypt. The dam across the Blue Nile River will be the largest hydropower facility in Africa.

Societal Perceptions of Aging

Betsy Abramson, Deputy Director, Wisconsin Institute for Healthy Aging, shares the history, origins, definitions and examples of ageism in the United States. Abramson explores the language use that is commonly used to perpetuate ageism and offers recommendations to combat the stereotypes.

Walking in Two Worlds

Alvin “Chip” Beal, Multicultural Affairs Coordinator, UW-Superior, explores issues in society caused by “isms” such as racism, sexism, heterosexism and ageism. Beal, a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, uses personal examples of how he has been affected and infected by “isms.”

Reclamation of Nonmetallic Mining Sites

Bronson Thalacker, Technician/Specialist, Soil & Water Conservation, Barron County, discusses the steps, required by state law, to reclaim non-metallic mines when mining is complete. Thalacker focuses on the high-quality sand in Wisconsin being used for hydrofracking and the land reclamation plans that are in place.

Gaylord Nelson and Earth Day

Bill Christofferson, Author, "The Man from Clear Lake," focuses on the life of Gaylord Nelson. Nelson was Governor of Wisconsin, a U.S. Senator and the founder of Earth Day. Christofferson highlights Nelson’s early life and delves into Nelson’s role as one of the leading environmentalists of the 20th century.

The Challenge of Democracy after the "Third Wave"

F. Peter Wagner, Associate Professor, Political Science, UW-Whitewater, discusses the three waves of global democratization: from 1820s until the aftermath of World War I, after World War II, and from the 1970s until the early 1990s. Wagner delves into the fourth wave which includes the Arab Spring.

Democracy and Social Protest in the Middle East

Molly Patterson, Assistant Professor, History, UW-Whitewater, explains the Arab Spring movement in Saudi Arabia and its effect on the Shia Muslim population.

The "Perpetual Crises of Democracy" in Latin America

Anne Hamilton, Lecturer, Political Science, UW-Whitewater, explains the components necessary for democracy and discusses the levels of freedom within various Latin American countries based on the rankings of Freedom House, a group which promotes democracy.

Memories, Lies and the Brain

Anthony Wagner, Professor, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Stanford University, explores neuroscience brain imaging as a means of determining the difference between actual memory and deception. Prosecutors, judges and juries must determine whether testimony is honest and accurate or dishonest and inaccurate. Mental state decoding could help to provide answers to these questions.

Is Democracy Possible in the Middle East?

Hala Ghoneim, Assistant Professor, Languages and Literatures, UW-Whitewater, discusses the skepticism surrounding the possibility of democracy in the Middle East, explains why it’s a fair to ask if there can be democracy and provides an overview of the Egyptian Spring.

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