History

Pioneers of Ecological Restoration

Franklin E. Court, author of "Pioneers of Ecological Restoration," explores the history of the UW-Madison arboretum and the people who created, shaped and sustained it. Leading up to the establishment of the arboretum in 1932, Court begins his history with John Nolen, the famous landscape architect who created plans for the city of Madison, UW-Madison and the Wisconsin state parks.

Father Groppi, Civil Rights Leader

Author Stuart Stotts, "Father Groppi: Marching for Civil Rights," shares the story of Father James Groppi's life, passions and struggles. Father Groppi was an influential civil rights leader during the late 1960s, a turbulent time nationally and in his hometown of Milwaukee. He worked tirelessly in, and for, the community he loved.

Wisconsin's Ethnic Diversity

Kazimierz J. Zaniewski, Geographer & Co-author, "Atlas of Ethnic Diversity in Wisconsin," Professor, Dept. of Geology, UW-Oshkosh, explores the origins of the ethnic groups who have immigrated to Wisconsin since the formation of the state in the 1840s. Zaniewski traced more than 60 ethnic groups through several immigration waves.

Life, Death, and Archaeology at Fort Blue Mounds

Robert Birmingham, Author, offers a glimpse into the lives of the soldiers and settlers who sought refuge at Fort Blue Mounds, strategically located in southwestern Wisconsin, during an 1832 conflict. Fast forwarding to the present; Birmingham along with Wisconsin Historical Society archaeologists and volunteers search for the fort and unearth fascinating details into the lives of the inhabitants.

A Farm in Wisconsin

Richard Quinney, Author, "A Farm in Wisconsin," shares the story of his family’s farm which grew from a few acres to the present day 160 acres. Quinney’s family farm in Walworth County, WI was purchased by his great-grandfather in 1868 shortly after emigrating from Ireland.

Milwaukee Anarchists, Clarence Darrow, and Justice

Dean Strang, Adjunct Professor, UW Law School and Marquette University, joins University Place Presents host Norman Gilliland to look back at the 1917 bombing of a Milwaukee police station that killed nine officers and a civilian. Eleven Italian immigrants were tried and charged based on an unrelated event. Clarence Darrow led an appeal that freed most of the convicted men.

Vital Skills

Jody Clowes, Curator, Vital Skills Exhibition, moderates a panel discussion about the importance and relevance of preserving traditional skills and the best means of passing them on. The panel includes: Jim Lorman, Ruth Olson, Anne Pryor, Robert Schulz, and Greg David.

The Poisoner's Guide to Life

Deborah Blum, Professor, School of Journalism and Mass Communication, UW-Madison, examines the history of poisons and the origins of chemical detection then invites the audience to solve a murder or two. Blum explores the way the lessons of forensics can help all of us navigate the maze of toxic chemicals in everyday life.

Limping through Life: A Farm Boy's Polio Memoir

Jerry Apps, Author and Professor Emeritus, UW-Madison, discusses his book, “Limping through Life: A Farm Boy’s Polio Memoir” with University Place Presents host Norman Gilliland. Apps, diagnosed with polio at the age of 12, shares the emotional and physical challenges he faced and explores how he has learned not only to cope, but to succeed.

50 years of Newborn Screening

Charles Brokopp, Director, Wisconsin State Laboratory of Hygiene, offers the history of screening newborns which began 50 years ago with testing for PKU, phenylketonuria. Newborn babies in Wisconsin are now screened for more than 40 disorders with early detection saving lives, improving quality of life and cutting health care costs.

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