History

Miracle on the Hudson

Jeff Skiles, Vice President, Experimental Aircraft Association, shares his story as the co-pilot of the US Airways plane that landed in the Hudson River on January 15, 2009. Skiles presents a moment by moment account of what has become known as the “Miracle on the Hudson.” This lecture was recorded at the EAA AirVenture Museum in Oshkosh.

The History and Science of Meat

Jeff Sindelar, Associate Professor, Department of Animal Sciences, UW-Madison, carves into the history of meat processing from ancient Roman times to present day, highlighting ways the industry developed in Wisconsin over the past 150 years.

Thornton Wilder: A Life

Penelope Niven, author of "Thornton Wilder: A Life," and Tappan Wilder, Thornton Wilder's nephew, delve into the life and works of Pulitzer Prize winning playwright and novelist Thornton Wilder.

The Legacy of Ice-Age Winds, Forest and Prairie

Joseph Mason, Professor, Department of Geography, UW-Madison, discusses naturalist John Muir’s walk from Madison to the Muir family farm in upper Marquette County in the 1860s. Mason highlights the changes in terrain, at that time, from rolling prairie in DeForest to wetlands in Poynette to forest in Ennis Lake.

Watergate, the Criminal Law and Ethics

John Dean, Author, Former White House Counsel, chronicles the Watergate break-in, the cover-up and the resulting downfall and resignation of President Richard Nixon.

The Great Peshtigo Fire

Scott Knickelbine, author of “The Great Peshtigo Fire: Stories and Science from America’s Deadliest Fire”, shares the history and relevance of the Great Peshtigo fire. The forestry and agriculture in Peshtigo, together with unusual environmental factors in 1817, come together to create this Wisconsin disaster.

The Scientist and the Lindbergh Kidnapping

Adam Schrager, author of " The Sixteenth Rail: The Evidence, The Scientist, and the Lindbergh Kidnapping," tells the story of Arthur Koehler, a forensic scientist with the Wisconsin Forest Product’s Lab. Koehler helped to solve the mystery of the kidnapping of Charles Lindbergh’s son by examining the ladder used to enter the home.

Pioneers of Ecological Restoration

Franklin E. Court, author of "Pioneers of Ecological Restoration," explores the history of the UW-Madison arboretum and the people who created, shaped and sustained it. Leading up to the establishment of the arboretum in 1932, Court begins his history with John Nolen, the famous landscape architect who created plans for the city of Madison, UW-Madison and the Wisconsin state parks.

Father Groppi, Civil Rights Leader

Author Stuart Stotts, "Father Groppi: Marching for Civil Rights," shares the story of Father James Groppi's life, passions and struggles. Father Groppi was an influential civil rights leader during the late 1960s, a turbulent time nationally and in his hometown of Milwaukee. He worked tirelessly in, and for, the community he loved.

Wisconsin's Ethnic Diversity

Kazimierz J. Zaniewski, Geographer & Co-author, "Atlas of Ethnic Diversity in Wisconsin," Professor, Dept. of Geology, UW-Oshkosh, explores the origins of the ethnic groups who have immigrated to Wisconsin since the formation of the state in the 1840s. Zaniewski traced more than 60 ethnic groups through several immigration waves.

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