History

American Women in Environmental History – Ep. 767

Nancy C. Unger, an associate professor of history at Santa Clara University, examines how the unique environmental concerns and activism of women framed the way the larger culture responded. She also highlights the contributions of Wisconsin women to environmental history. Unger is the author of “Beyond Nature's Housekeepers: American Women in Environmental History.”

The Lithographs of George Bellows - Ep. 765

James Pearson, the exhibitions director at the Wright Museum of Art at Beloit College, joins University Place Presents host Norman Gilliland to discuss the lithographs created by George Bellows. Bellows was active in the Ashcan movement, which consisted of artists painting and drawing life on city streets, in tenement buildings and the rise of the working class.

Photographic Methods Before Photography Ep. 763

Dan Fuller, a lecturer in the Department of Art History at UW-Madison joins University Place Presents host Norman Gilliland to explain the history of photographic methods before the invention of photography.

If Trees Could Talk - Ep. 760

R. Bruce Allison, author of “If Trees Could Talk,” offers fascinating stories that introduce noteworthy trees, both past and present, across Wisconsin.

Vernacular Architecture – Ep. 758

Anna Andrzejewski, an associate professor in the Department of Art History at UW-Madison, discusses vernacular buildings or “everyday spaces” through the perspective of anthropology, history, American studies, cultural geography, landscape architecture and history, folklore, and material culture to construct frameworks that help us describe the common buildings and landscapes of America.

The Geologic Story of Four Lakes - Ep. 748

David Mickelson, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Geology & Geophysics at UW-Madison, shares the geologic story of Lake Mendota, Glacial Lake Wisconsin, Indian Lake and Devil’s Lake.

The All American Girls Professional Baseball League - Ep.743

Author Bob Kann, author of "Joyce Westerman: Baseball Hero," shares Kenosha native Joyce Westerman’s stories of growing up during the Great Depression, working at American Motors, and playing professional baseball. Westerman played for eight years in the All American Girls Professional Baseball League depicted in the movie, "A League of Their Own."

The Camp Randall Memorial Arch – Ep. 739

Daniel Einstein, the historic and cultural resources manager in Campus Planning and Landscape Architecture at UW-Madison, presents the history of the Camp Randall Arch. For 100 years, the arch has offered a gateway to a 5-acre memorial park honoring the 70,000 Union soldiers who received military training at the site during the Civil War.

100 Years of Cosmic Ray Discovery - Ep. 724

Mike Duvernois, the Scientist Instrument Project Manager at the WI IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, discusses cosmic rays. Austrian physicist Victor Franz Hess, experimenting with balloons in 1912, found an unexpected increase in atmospheric radiation as his balloon rose. The mysterious radiation particles were named “cosmic rays.” To this day, their origins are still unknown.

Wisconsin’s Driftless Region - Ep. 705

Eric Carson, an assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at UW-Extension, shares his research of the Driftless Area of southwest Wisconsin--known for its unique lack of glacial deposits. The landscape of the Driftless Area owes its form to long-term erosion by stream systems that have incised into the Paleozoic bedrock.

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