History

The Principled Politician: A Story of Courage - Ep. 699

Adam Schrager, a producer at Wisconsin Public Television, tells the story of Ralph Carr who was drafted to run for governor of Colorado in 1938. Carr became a national figure when he defended the Constitutional rights of Japanese-Americans after Pearl Harbor. His outspoken and unpopular stance would cost him greatly, both personally and professionally.

The Making of "Seaworthy" - Ep. 670

Micaela Sullivan-Fowler, the coordinator of historical services at UW-Madison Libraries, shares stories of the sea: the eradication of scurvy, the interplay between whaling and women's health, the toll on the lives of slaves on the Middle Passage, the development of SCUBA, the impacts of chronic sea sickness on young Charles Darwin, and the mental health of seafarers.

The Wreck of the Christmas Tree Ship - Ep. 667

Keith Meverden and Tamara Thomsen, Maritime Archaeologists at the Wisconsin Historical Society, share the legend and history of the Rouse Simmons, also known as the Christmas Tree ship, which sank in November 1912. The ship was transporting Christmas trees from Michigan to Chicago when it disappeared between the Kewaunee and Two Rivers Life Saving stations.

Science and Engineering in WWII - Ep. 665

Lieutenant colonel Todd Berge, the Commander of AFROTC Det. 925, describes the technology, design, refinements, and uses of the Flying Fortress, the B-17 Bomber, and its impact on the European Theatre in WWII. Captain Scott Mobley, from the Department of History at UW-Madison, shares the saga of The Origins and Use of the Torpedo in World War II.

Catastrophic Geologic Events in Paleozoic Wisconsin - Ep....

Patrick McLaughlin, an assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at UW-Extension, discusses the ongoing research at the Wisconsin Geological and Natural History Survey focused on deciphering the rock record of shifts in the ancient ocean-atmosphere system and their correlation with biological evolution.

Portraits of Manhattan before and after 9/11: Voice of a...

Richard Quinney, author and founder of Borderland Books, and Susan C. Fox, a professor at Corcoran College of Art & Design discuss Manhattan in the late 1960s and from 2002-2006. Quinney's book, "Once Upon an Island," includes photographs of the construction of the World Trade Center and New York City in the late 1960s. Fox chronicles the lasting affect 9/11 had on the surrounding communities.

Voices of Labor and Social Justice in Wisconsin - Ep. 642

Bruce Mouser, Professor Emeritus in the Department of History at UW-LaCrosse, and Paul Boyer Professor Emeritus in the Department of History at UW-Madison, introduce two powerful voices from the 19th century in this look at the deep roots of labor activism and social justice in Wisconsin. Mouser focuses on George Edwin Taylor while Boyer explores Robert Koehler's painting, "The Strike."

Entrepreneurship and the Arts - Ep. 633

Ben Sidran, musician and author, discusses the intersection of the arts and entrepreneurialism. He introduces his upcoming book, "There was a Fire: Jews, Music and the American Dream," and shares his experiences in the music business.

The Laboratory of Democracy - Ep. 632

Jonathan Kasparek, an assistant professor in the Department of History at UW-Waukesha, examines how progressive legislation reinvented democracy in the early 19th century and laid the groundwork for national reform. Kasparek explains that Wisconsin was in the forefront of state government reform.

Madison: History of a Model City - Ep. 622

Erika Janik, author of "Madison: History of a Model City," discusses how Madison transformed itself from the "center of the wilderness" to the "Laboratory of Democracy."

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