History

Wisconsin Innovations - Ep. 671

Dave Driscoll and Joe Kapler, curators at the Wisconsin Historical Museum, discuss the exhibit, "Wisconsin Innovations: from the Iconic to the Unexpected." Learn about the decision process they went through, the challenges of presenting research in a popular, artifact-based format and enjoy the stories behind some of the state's best and least-known inventions.

A Recipe for Success: Lizzie Kander and Her Cookbook

Bob Kahn, Author Bob Kann, author of "A Recipe for Success: Lizzie Kander and Her Cookbook," shares stories about Lizzie Kander, Milwaukee's early 20th century culinary wonder. Kander's "Settlement Cook Book" helped young immigrant girls learn to cook nutritious "American-style" meals. The proceeds from her book helped to build Milwaukee's first settlement house and later Jewish Community...

Back in the World: Portraits of Wisconsin Vietnam Veterans

James Gill Photographer, WPT. George Banda Combat medic, 101st Airborne Div. Bruce Jensen Gunners mate, USS Stone County, Mobile Riverine Force.
James Kurtz Platoon leader, 1st Infantry Div. Rev. Ray Stubbe, Navy chaplain, Siege of Khe Sanh. Willie Williams Staff sergeant, 25th Infantry Div. Mik Derks Producer, WPT. Panel discussion related to Jim Gill's portraits of Wisconsin Vietnam Veterans.

The Story of Wisconsin's Partial Veto Power

Fred Wade, Attorney, talks about the Frankenstein veto, which is the power of the governor to use his partial veto power in a way that allows him to make laws that were not originally approved by the legislature. Fred discusses the contradiction this posses and looks into the history of Wisconsin's state constitution.

The Arts & Sciences of Brewing Beer at Home

Ella Braden, a Physicist at the Wonders of Physics, UW-Madison, explores the process of home brewing beer from both historic and scientific viewpoints. Some of the earliest writing contains recipes for beer and although the process of making beer is simple, the variations that lead to the many styles of beer are fascinating.

Religion, Education and the International Political Economy

Amy Stambach, Educational Policy Studies, UW Madison, discusses the role of American Evangelical missions in Africa. The first decade of the 21st century marks a high point in missionary involvement in international development work.

Archaeological Excavations. in Door County

Paul Reckner, Archaeologist, Wisconsin Historical Society, explores the relationship between the geological and cultural histories that have drawn humans for at least 2,500 years to Wisconsin, Door County and Nicolet Bay.

The Principled Politician: A Story of Courage - Ep. 699

Adam Schrager, a producer at Wisconsin Public Television, tells the story of Ralph Carr who was drafted to run for governor of Colorado in 1938. Carr became a national figure when he defended the Constitutional rights of Japanese-Americans after Pearl Harbor. His outspoken and unpopular stance would cost him greatly, both personally and professionally.

The Making of "Seaworthy" - Ep. 670

Micaela Sullivan-Fowler, the coordinator of historical services at UW-Madison Libraries, shares stories of the sea: the eradication of scurvy, the interplay between whaling and women's health, the toll on the lives of slaves on the Middle Passage, the development of SCUBA, the impacts of chronic sea sickness on young Charles Darwin, and the mental health of seafarers.

The Wreck of the Christmas Tree Ship - Ep. 667

Keith Meverden and Tamara Thomsen, Maritime Archaeologists at the Wisconsin Historical Society, share the legend and history of the Rouse Simmons, also known as the Christmas Tree ship, which sank in November 1912. The ship was transporting Christmas trees from Michigan to Chicago when it disappeared between the Kewaunee and Two Rivers Life Saving stations.

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