Arts/Culture

A Conversation with Gwen Ifill - Ep. 651

Gwen Ifill, the moderator and managing editor of "Washington Week" shares her journey beginning as a newspaper reporter to her present job at PBS. Ifill talks about her mentor, Tim Russert, her tried and true means to get a comment for a story and her work at PBS.

Colors of Nature: Culture, Identity and the Natural World...

Kimberly Blaeser, professor, Dept.of English at UW-Milwaukee, Debra Kang Dean, MFA in Writing faculty at Spalding University, Maria Melendez, editor/publisher of Pilgrimage Magazine, Lauret Savoy, professor of Environmental Studies & Geology at Mount Holyoke College, and Patrick Thomas, publisher of "Colors of Nature: Culture Identity and the Natural World" investigate culture, place and identity.

Portraits of Manhattan before and after 9/11: Voice of a...

Richard Quinney, author and founder of Borderland Books, and Susan C. Fox, a professor at Corcoran College of Art & Design discuss Manhattan in the late 1960s and from 2002-2006. Quinney's book, "Once Upon an Island," includes photographs of the construction of the World Trade Center and New York City in the late 1960s. Fox chronicles the lasting affect 9/11 had on the surrounding communities.

Voices of Labor and Social Justice in Wisconsin - Ep. 642

Bruce Mouser, Professor Emeritus in the Department of History at UW-LaCrosse, and Paul Boyer Professor Emeritus in the Department of History at UW-Madison, introduce two powerful voices from the 19th century in this look at the deep roots of labor activism and social justice in Wisconsin. Mouser focuses on George Edwin Taylor while Boyer explores Robert Koehler's painting, "The Strike."

Making Fast Food - Ep. 638

Nicolaas Mink, a visiting assistant professor in the Environmental Studies Department at Knox College, discusses the deep roots of fast food in American life and culture. We normally think of fast food beginning in the American suburbs with the emergence of great chains like McDonald's, but that's not the case.

Entrepreneurship and the Arts - Ep. 633

Ben Sidran, musician and author, discusses the intersection of the arts and entrepreneurialism. He introduces his upcoming book, "There was a Fire: Jews, Music and the American Dream," and shares his experiences in the music business.

Old Time Radio Drama: The Time Machine - Ep. 629

Join Wisconsin Public Radio's "Old Time Radio Show" for a live broadcast of H.G. Wells' play "The Time Machine." Produced by Norman Gilliland and adapted by Patricia Boyette, student actors from the UW-Madison Dept. of Theater and Drama travel through time and meet beings from the year 100,080.

Explorations from Music and Neuroscience - Ep. 628

Steve Paulson from Wisconsin Public Radio moderates a lecture, meditation, jazz performance, and discussion with Richard Davidson, the Director of the Lab for Affective Neuroscience at UW-Madison, Ben Sidran, a renowned musician and author, and musicians Leo Sidran and Billy Peterson. Davidson and Ben Sidran explore the relationship between the brain and music.

Killer Clues: The Art and Science of Murder - Ep. 627

Deborah Blum, a professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at UW-Madison, hosts a panel discussion about forensics use in solving crime. Panel members include Beth Amos, author, Dr. Michael Stier, an associate professor in the Dept. of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at UW-Madison, and Melanie Hampton, a crime scene investigator from the City of Madison Police Department.

A Conversation with Cathy Dethmers - Ep. 620

Cathy Dethmers, owner of the High Noon Saloon in Madison, discusses the problems she faced opening the High Noon Saloon after her first tavern and music venue, O'Cayz Corral burned down.

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