Wednesday Nite @ the Lab

Sustainable Bioenergy in Wisconsin: How Could It Work?

Gary Radloff, the director of Midwest Energy Policy Analysis, and Carol Barford, a research scientist in Global Ecosystems, both at SAGE, UW-Madison, discuss the important aspects of sustainable bioenergy production in Wisconsin, and highlight the balance points between environmental quality, farm management, and economic feasibility.

Fish Endocrinology and Aquaculture Research at the UW

Terence Barry Senior Scientist, Department of Animal Science, UW-Madison, explains what aquaculture is before discussing the UW Laboratory of Fish Endocrinology and Aquaculture. After speaking about the facilities, he gives a brief overview of the last five years of their research.

When Microbes Attack, Plants Fight Back

Laura Helft, a Ph.D. student studying Cellular and Molecular Biology at UW-Madison, provides a whirlwind tour of plant pathology--how we know plants are sick, what we know about plant diseases, what we know about the plant immune system, and how microbes are able to attack plants.

New Trends in Plant Disease Diagnosis Across Wisconsin

Brian Hudelson, outreach specialist in Plant Pathology at the UW-Extension, talks about common (and bizarre) plant problems that arrive daily at the UW-Madison/Extension Plant Disease Diagnostics Clinic. The Clinic serves farmers, greenhouse owners, gardeners and homeowners from all over Wisconsin and helps track the ebb and flow of plant diseases across the state.

The Arts & Sciences of Brewing Beer at Home

Ella Braden, a Physicist at the Wonders of Physics, UW-Madison, explores the process of home brewing beer from both historic and scientific viewpoints. Some of the earliest writing contains recipes for beer and although the process of making beer is simple, the variations that lead to the many styles of beer are fascinating.

The Geospatial Revolution

Jim Lacy, the associate state cartographer in the Department of Geography at the UW-Madison, explains that geospatial technology refers to the tools, techniques, data, and skills used to inventory and analyze the relationship of people, places, and things in our world. Virtually all of the information that you share with people has some kind of geospatial tag.

Antiviral Drugs and Vaccines – Ep. 723

Holly Basta, a research assistant at the Institute for Molecular Virology at UW-Madison, explores the use of vaccines and their effectiveness. Basta uses computer modeling to research Rhinovirus C, a virus found to be common in asthmatic children.

Biosafety, Compliance, and UW Influenza Research - Ep. 696

Rebecca Moritz, the research compliance specialist with the Department of Environment, Health & Safety at UW-Madison, discusses some of the many steps taken to mitigate the inherent risks involved with influenza research at UW-Madison.

The Making of "Seaworthy" - Ep. 670

Micaela Sullivan-Fowler, the coordinator of historical services at UW-Madison Libraries, shares stories of the sea: the eradication of scurvy, the interplay between whaling and women's health, the toll on the lives of slaves on the Middle Passage, the development of SCUBA, the impacts of chronic sea sickness on young Charles Darwin, and the mental health of seafarers.

Science and Engineering in WWII - Ep. 665

Lieutenant colonel Todd Berge, the Commander of AFROTC Det. 925, describes the technology, design, refinements, and uses of the Flying Fortress, the B-17 Bomber, and its impact on the European Theatre in WWII. Captain Scott Mobley, from the Department of History at UW-Madison, shares the saga of The Origins and Use of the Torpedo in World War II.

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