Wednesday Nite @ the Lab

Do Older Elephants Ever Forget? Aging, Memory and the...

Hilary Gerstein, a research assistant in the Neuroscience Training Program at UW-Madison, explains her research into the function of certain genes in the hippocampus that have been implicated in learning and memory.

The Centennial Study of Concrete - Ep. 557

Steve Cramer, professor and associate dean of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at UW-Madison, discusses the longest-running university concrete research project in the country. The project began at UW-Madison in 1910 by Owen Withey. Intended to last ten years, the study has continued for a century.

The Beaver Dam Eye Study - Ep.555

Barbara E.K. Klein MD, a professor in the Department of Population Health Sciences at UW-Madison, shares her research into the prevalence and incidence of age-related cataract, macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy, common eye diseases in an aging population.

Explorations in Chocolate - Ep. 552

Rich Hartel, a professor in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at UW-Madison, examines how food scientists characterize and then tune the properties of melted chocolate to best fit different applications, from enrobing candy bars to forming drops and molding pieces. Delve into how melted chocolate is tempered to ensure it properly turns solid when cooled.

Maple Syrup Education - Ep. 547

Ruth Ann Lee, an educator at the Mackenzie Environmental Education Center in Poynette, WI, discusses Sisibaskwat, or time of the melting snow--better known as maple sugaring time. Lee explains what makes this a successful environmental education program for the Center, which hosts thousands of school kids annually to celebrate spring.

Hydroecology in Sierra Nevada - Ep. 545

Steven Loheide, an assistant professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at UW-Madison, explains the hydrologic processes and how the movement of water through the landscape, over the land surface, and through the subsurface affect ecological processes. Loheide focuses on Tuolumne Meadows in the California Sierra Nevada mountains.

Wind Turbine Generators: The Basics - Ep. 541

Mitch Bradt, Program Director, Department of Engineering Professional Development, UW Madison.
Mitch Brandt presents the basics of wind turbine generators explaining everything from the physics involved in determining the angle of the blade to how electricity is created and distributed.

Picture the World with Kaleidoscope Dyes - Ep. 540

Stephen Paddock, a microscopist in the Department of Molecular Biology at UW-Madison, describes how using fluorescent dyes attached to antibodies, DNA, RNA or other molecules enables scientists to see and map their locations in cells. Recent advances in microscopy also produce strikingly beautiful images that celebrate the excitement of discovery and the power of scientific information.

A New Theory of Everything: Climate, Energy, and the...

James Pawley, professor emeritus in the UW Department of Zoology, explains the need for a new theoretical basis for complex systems such as climate, energy and the economy. During the Industrial Revolution, science gained a reputation for mathematical accuracy and precision. We have entered the Age of Chaos where accurate predictions are impossible and, therefore, we must create a new theory.

The Science Constellation at UW-Madison - Ep. 536

Dave Nelson, a professor in the Department of Biochemistry at UW-Madison, and Tom Zinnen, the outreach program manager at the UW Biotechnology Center, share the stage to discuss community outreach activities on campus from 1862 to the present. Zinnen introduces the UW Science Constellation--an invitation to experience science, within and with a community of researchers.

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