Wednesday Nite @ the Lab

Cheese is Alive!

Heather Paxson, Associate Professor, MIT Anthropology, Mark Johnson, Assistant Director, Center for Dairy Research, UW-Madison and Andy Hatch, Co-owner, Uplands Cheese discuss the political life of our food—particularly cheese. Paxson discusses her research on the regulation of raw milk cheeses.

Modeling Head Injuries with Fruit Flies

David Wassarman, Professor, Cell & Regenerative Biology, UW-Madison, discusses traumatic brain injury and why the disorder is difficult to treat. Wasserman presents data from experimental fruit fly studies which are advancing our understanding of the molecular and cellular events that occur with traumatic brain injury.

Wisconsin’s Wild Bees

Rachel Mallinger, Graduate Student, Department of Entomology, UW-Madison, discusses the importance of the native, wild bees to the pollination process. With the decline in honey bee populations, can the 500 species of native bees living in Wisconsin fulfill our food needs?

The Grand Challenges for Engineering

Ian Robertson, Dean, College of Engineering, UW-Madison, discusses his work with the National Science Foundation and the origins of the Materials Genome Initiative.

Past, Present, and Future of Vehicle Electrification

Theodore Bohn, Senior Power Electronics Engineer, Argonne National Laboratory, presents a history of electric vehicles over the past 100 years. Bohn discusses the pros and cons of the different types of battery power that have been used, how electric cars are currently being powered and what the future looks like.

New Hormone-Receptor System in Plants

Mike Sussman, Director, UW Biotechnology Center, describes a signaling pathway that regulates cell expansion in the root cells of Arabidopsis plants, a model organism related to cabbage and mustard that is the plant scientist's fruit fly. This discovery is the first such pathway found for the plant kingdom, revealing the details of how a particular hormone docks with a cell.

Electric Organs in the Strong-Voltage Electric Eel

Lindsay Traeger, Graduate Student, Department of Biochemistry, UW-Madison, discusses the electric eel, a freshwater fish from South America, which can generate voltage using three electric organs in its tail made up of electrocytes. Understanding the complex traits of electrocytes may help with the development of biobatteries.

Traces of Prescription Drugs Found in Lake Michigan

Curtis Hedman, Advanced Microbiologist, Wisconsin State Lab of Hygiene, discusses the pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) found two miles offshore from Milwaukee in Lake Michigan. Toxicological findings show that the contaminants were found at concentrations considered at medium or high risk for aquatic organisms.

The Centennial and Future of Cooperative Extension

Richard Klemme, Dean and Director, UWEX Cooperative Extension, celebrates the first 100 years of Cooperative Extension Service. The 1862 Morrill Act set up colleges of agriculture and mechanic arts providing for the instruction mission. The 1887 Hatch Act set up agricultural experiment stations providing for the research mission and the Smith-Lever Act in 1914 provided for the extension mission.

Canoes: The Art and Science of Hydro Dynamic Design

Liese Pfeifer, Academic Curator, Design Gallery, UW School of Human Ecology; James Steiner, Outreach Program Coordinator, Center for Integrative Design, UW-Madison; and Nick Molzahn, student, Dept. of Chemical & Biological Engineering, UW-Madison, discuss high performance racing canoes, concrete canoes and ancient canoe artifacts, exhibited at the Design Gallery at the School of Human Ecology.

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