Wednesday Nite @ the Lab

100 Years of Cosmic Ray Discovery - Ep. 724

Mike Duvernois, the Scientist Instrument Project Manager at the WI IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, discusses cosmic rays. Austrian physicist Victor Franz Hess, experimenting with balloons in 1912, found an unexpected increase in atmospheric radiation as his balloon rose. The mysterious radiation particles were named “cosmic rays.” To this day, their origins are still unknown.

The Science and Art of Making Sausage – Ep. 722

Jeff Sindelar, an assistant professor of Animal Sciences at UW-Madison, demonstrates and explains the important scientific principles of sausage (bratwurst and summer sausage) manufacturing while intertwining the history and art associated with these products.

Relearning to Balance After Stroke or Brain Injury – Ep. 720

Beth Meyerand, a professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering at UW-Madison, introduces a device that uses electrical stimulation via the tongue to induce a sustained behavioral improvement in balance in patient populations that have balance dysfunction.

Connecting Scientists & Lifelong Learners - Ep. 717

Dennis Schatz, senior vice president at the Pacific Science Center in Seattle, WA, talks about the Portal to the Public, which connects research scientists and science based professionals, to public audiences. The project, funded by the National Science Foundation, focuses on lifelong learning in the scientific fields.

UW's Dictionary of American Regional English – Ep. 716

Joan Houston Hall, chief editor of The Dictionary of American Regional English at UW-Madison, explores whether American English is becoming “homogenized” by the media and the mobility of the American population. Based on fieldwork and a collection of written materials, DARE includes terms that we use that are “normal” to us but that may not be understood by people in other places.

Wisconsin’s Driftless Region - Ep. 705

Eric Carson, an assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at UW-Extension, shares his research of the Driftless Area of southwest Wisconsin--known for its unique lack of glacial deposits. The landscape of the Driftless Area owes its form to long-term erosion by stream systems that have incised into the Paleozoic bedrock.

An Early Cahokian Colony in Wisconsin – Ep. 702

Danielle Benden, academic curator in the Department of Anthropology at UW-Madison, explores the mystery behind a 1000-year-old mission site in the Village of Trempealeau, Wisconsin. Colonists, called Mississippian peoples by archaeologists, arrived from America’s first city, Cahokia, near modern day St. Louis, Missouri, 750 miles away, in dugout canoes.

The Great Japan Earthquake and Tsunami of 2011 – Ep. 698

Harold Tobin, a professor in the Department of Geoscience at UW-Madison, discusses the March 11, 2011 earthquake and trans-Pacific tsunami, the causes and history of these mega-earthquakes, and what took place beneath the waves. Tobin explores how the tsunami warning system worked and how this event triggered a reassessment of the hazard presented by such undersea faults around the world.

The John Steuart Curry Murals – Ep. 695

Dave Nelson, a professor in the Department of Biochemistry at UW-Madison, and Lauren Kroiz, an assistant professor in the Department of Art History at UW-Madison, discuss the John Steuart Curry mural “The Social Benefits of Research in Biochemistry” which depicts discoveries by researchers Stephen Babcock, E.B. Hart, Harry Steenbock, and E.V. McCollum.

Diving the Wreck of the Appomattox – Ep. 693

Tamara Thomsen, a maritime archaeologist at the Wisconsin Historical Society, dives into the wreck of the largest wooden bulk carrier ever built, the Appomattox. The ship, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, lies on the bottom of Lake Michigan less than 200 feet off shore at Atwater Beach in the village of Shorewood, north of Milwaukee.

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