History Sandwiched In

The Black Hawk War in Wisconsin

John Hall, Associate Professor in the Department of History at UW-Madison, offers an historical perspective of the conflicts which lead to the Black Hawk War.

Milwaukee's First Mexican Community

Sergio González, Doctoral Student in the Department of History at UW-Madison, explores the history of the Mexican community in Milwaukee during the early twentieth century. González discusses how the discrimination the immigrants faced in their workplaces and neighborhoods fostered a sense of community and ethnic pride.

Wisconsin's Pre-Professional Base Ball Teams

Ryan Schwartz, Event Coordinator at Old World Wisconsin, explores the history of base ball games beginning in the early 1800s. Schwartz delves into a controversy focused on whether the game of Rounders was an early form of baseball or whether Abner Doubleday created the sport.

The Walleye War and Its Aftermath

Larry Nesper, Professor in the Department of Anthropology at UW-Madison, details the conflicts between the state of Wisconsin and the Ojibwe bands of northern Wisconsin in the 1980s and 1990s concerning the Native Americans' right to spearfish. Nesper discusses how the relationship between the state and the tribes have transformed in subsequent years.

Ship Captain’s Daughter

Ann Lewis, Author of “Ship Captain's Daughter,” reflects on what it was like to grow up in the family of a Great Lakes shipping captain.

Wisconsin's Famous Effigy Mounds

Amy Rosebrough, Archaeologist at the Wisconsin Historical Society, discusses the sacred earthen sculptures created by Native people a thousand years ago to mark the graves of their dead. The effigy mounds, found primarily in Wisconsin, take the shapes of animals, birds and spirits.

Dressing Children in the 19th Century

Leslie Bellais, Curator of Social History at the Wisconsin Historical Society, discusses the changes in attitudes about children’s clothing beginning in the late 1700s. Instead of dressing young children as miniature adults, clothing which allowed children more freedom of movement became the fashion.

Ole Evinrude and His Outboard Motor

Bob Jacobson, Author of “Ole Evinrude and His Outboard Motor,” shares the success story of Ole Evinrude. Jacobson traces Evinrude's story from the time the family left Norway when Evinrude was three, to his invention of the outboard motor.

Genealogy and the Wisconsin Historical Society

Lori Bessler, Reference Librarian at the Wisconsin Historical Society, reviews the resources available at the Wisconsin Historical Society to help research local and family histories.

The Christmas Tree Ship

Tamara Thomsen, Maritime Archaeologist with the Wisconsin Historical Society, and John Janzen, Underwater Videographer, present the story of the shipwrecked schooner Rouse Simmons. The ship, filled with Christmas trees, was en route to Chicago when it sank on November 22, 1912. Thomsen and Janzen share a new video which provides an underwater tour of the wreck site.

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