History Sandwiched In

Southern Wisconsin's Glacial Landscape

David Mickelson, Professor Emeritus, Geology and Geophysics, UW-Madison, shares an historical perspective of how the landscape could have been viewed a hundred years ago and contrasts that with a new remote sensing technology called “Lidar,” a combination of light and radar.

A Relic from Lincoln's Deathbed?

Leslie Bellais, Curator, Costumes and Textiles, Wisconsin Historical Society, presents a bedspread from the Wisconsin Historical Society’s collection which was purported to have been on bed where Abraham Lincoln died. Bellais examines the evidence, sources and theories surrounding the bedspread.

Milwaukee Mayhem

Matthew J. Prigge, Author, "Milwaukee Mayhem," shares stories of mystery, murder and mayhem during the early years of Milwaukee’s history as a city.

The Interstate Bicycle Network

James Longhurst, Associate Professor, History, UW-La Crosse, explores the 1890s idea of a sidepath network of hard-surface bike paths, protected by law, crossing the nation. Networks were built from upstate New York to central Minnesota.

Wisconsin 101: Our History in Objects

Thomas Broman, Professor, History of Science Department, UW-Madison, and Sergio González, Graduate Student, Department of History, UW-Madison, introduce a collaborative public history project which shares a community’s interesting or important objects through an interactive website.

Schwinn Bicycle's Distribution System

Richard Schwinn, Great-grandson of Ignaz Schwinn, shares the history of the Schwinn Bicycle Company and focuses on the bicycle distribution system, Schwinn’s secret success factor.

The Unexpected Belle La Follette

Nancy C. Unger, Author, “Belle La Follette: Progressive Era Reformer,” explores surprising truths about Belle La Follette, a radical reformer who was a very influential woman in the realm of public affairs in the United States.

The Scandinavian Invasion of the Midwest

Julie K. Allen, Associate Professor, Department of Scandinavian Studies, UW-Madison, traces the legacy of the nearly three million Scandinavians who immigrated to the U.S. between 1825 and 1930. Many of whom settled in the Midwest, fought in the Civil War, created homesteads, built Lutheran churches and universities and shaped the culture in their new country.

The Life of Carrie Chapman Catt

Rebecca Rodriguez, Librarian, Grace Balloch Memorial Library, Spearfish, South Dakota, shares the story of Carrie Chapman Catt from Ripon, Wisconsin, a suffragette and an advocate for women’s rights in the late 1800s. Catt served as president of the National Woman's Suffrage Association, and founder and president of the International Woman's Suffrage Alliance.

Wisconsin's Underground Railroad

Jesse Gant, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History, UW-Madison, looks at the myths and legends surrounding the stories of the Underground Railroad in Wisconsin. Grant highlights the rescues of Joshua Glover and Caroline Quarlls and discusses racial attitudes in the years before the Civil War.

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