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Here & Now

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Anchored by Frederica Freyberg, Here & Now is Wisconsin’s weekly in-depth news and public affairs program where civic and political leaders provide context to the issues at the forefront of life in Wisconsin.

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May 19, 2017

Republican State Rep. Joe Sanfelippo details two bills that target serious juvenile crime.

March 10, 2017

Less than a year ago, Waukesha gained approval to divert water from Lake Michigan. This permission was granted as an exception to the Great Lakes Compact. But now cities surrounding the Great Lakes in the U.S. and Canada are challenging to decision. Scott Gordon is a reporter for WisContext.

March 10, 2017

Joel Brammeier is the president of the Alliance for the Great Lakes. The federal proposal would drastically cut funding for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative from $300 million to $10 million annually. Last year alone, Wisconsin saw $3 million in funding from the initiative.

March 3, 2017

U.S. Rep. Glenn Grothman, R-Wis., discussed President Donald Trump's first addresses to Congress. Trump struck a relatively unifying tone compared to much of his past rhetoric. Grothman said this is the demeanor he expects Trump to assume for the rest of his time in office.

March 3, 2017

Chad Billeb, the Deputy Sheriff of Marathon County, talked about undocumented immigrants' fear due to the new administration's emphasis on stricter deportation enforcement. Billeb said some in the large Hispanic population in and around Wausau are scared to go about their daily routine for fear of deportation. The Sheriff Department is now doing its best to quell those fears.

March 3, 2017

La Movida is the state's first Spanish language radio station, and they're looking to educate Madison's Hispanic community about what's going on. The husband and wife who run the station say they're looking to debunk rumors and calm the fears of many undocumented immigrants in the community. They've been talking to local law enforcement and public officials about the reality of the current situation.

March 3, 2017

U.S. Rep. Mark Pocan, D-Wis., talked about President Donald Trump first month and a half in office. Trump gave his first address to Congress this week. Pocan brought college student Lupe Salmeron, a DACA recipient, to the address in which Trump vowed once again to ramp up border security and deportation for undocumented immigrants.

March 3, 2017

The measure would allow industrial wells without state review in places already permitted for wells. An Assembly committee took out a provision that would have expanded citizen's rights to sue the operators of the high-power pumps, which many have linked to problems in streams, lakes and drinking water. The bill now matches its companion in the state Senate.

March 3, 2017

Wisconsin U.S. Reps. Mark Pocan and Glenn Grothman talk about President Donald Trump's first Congressional address, Marathon County Deputy Sheriff talks about quelling the fears of undocumented immigrants in his community and a look into how a Spanish language radio station in Madison is looking to educate the Hispanic community.

February 24, 2017

Incumbent state superintendent Tony Evers and challenger Lowell Holtz won this week's primary race. Evers placed first easily, with around 69 percent of the vote, while Holtz walked away with 23 percent. Another challenger, John Humphries received around 7 percent of the vote and will not advance to the general election.

February 24, 2017

Gov. Scott Walker has proposed many welfare changes in his state budget proposal. The proposal would extend the requirement that people work 80 hours a month to receive food stamps to parents of school-aged children. It would also move forward with drug testing as a requirement for food stamp recipients.

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WisContext serves the residents of Wisconsin, providing information and insight into issues as they affect the state.