A Stained Glass Garden

A Stained Glass Garden

Part of Ep. 901 Personal Spaces, Public Spaces

Sturgeon Bay Master Gardener Karin and Mike Overbeck show off their garden at the Everygreen School, built in 1905.

Premiere date: Mar 03, 2001

TRANSCRIPT+
Wisc Gardener Transcript: 

Shelley:
This is a private garden in Sturgeon Bay. It's owned by Karin and Mike Overbeck. Karin is also a Door County Master Gardener here. Karin, in walking through these lovely gardens; two things I notice-- stained glass everywhere, and these fantastic rock walls and rock planters. This is an old schoolhouse.

Karin:
Yes, it's the Evergreen School, built in 1905.

Shelley:
Wow, so it's been around a while.

Karin:
Yes, and when we added-on the house, we started digging and all this rock came up.

Shelley:
So, you didn't import any of the rock I see in the gardens? It kind of came with the yard?

Karin:
It came with the yard, yes.

Shelley:
You did a fantastic job of taking it and using it as part of the gardens. They're lovely this way.

Karin:
Yes, Mike did a good job with it.

Shelley:
Well, what about the stained glass, how did that get here?

Karin:
Well, stained glass has been a hobby of mine for 20 years. And I like to incorporate it into the gardens, also.

Shelley:
Well, then tell me about some of your favorite spots.

Karin:
Well, the first garden was the vegetable garden. We have raised beds there. And I wanted to make these stained glass stepping stones, so I incorporated names of some vegetables and tried to make an abstract design into these stepping stones.

Shelley:
What a beautiful idea. I bet it's really colorful after it rains.

Karin:
Yes, it is. And one of my favorite plants in this garden is the Porcelain Vine.

Shelley:
That has the beautiful variegated leaves and the purply-blue berries, too. It's really lovely.

Karin:
Yes, with the pink stems.

Shelley:
Tell me about another spot you like.

Karin:
Another spot that's quite unusual is the rock garden. We knew the rock was here, this is Door County.

Shelley:
What do you mean, you knew the it was here, though? It was buried?

Karin:
It was buried just a few inches underneath.

Shelley:
Oh, really? Okay. So, how did you create it?

Karin:
We just dug in between the rocks. It was actually rock upon rock. And one of my favorite plants in here is the Silver Lace Vine. And it's in bloom right now. Mike made this butterfly, and I embedded stained glass in it.

Shelley:
So, you've got stained glass, really, everywhere. I also noticed you've got some squash and pumpkins just kind of rambling amongst the rocks. I bet they like the hot, dry conditions.

Karin:
They really do. it's a good place to put them. They can ramble on and on.

Shelley:
That's an easy way to make a rock garden, just scrape the soil off the top. We can't all do that.

Karin:
An ingrown rock garden.

Shelley:
There you go. You also said that you added some more rock planters alongside of the school house so you had something to look at outside the windows .

Karin:
Yes, there are three triangular beds. And I've got Weeping Mulberry in the middle one, which makes it look kind of a formal garden.

Shelley:
So, you have a nice contrast of a weeping plant with the bold lines of the rock, too.

Karin:
There's also a weeping pea and weeping pussy willow.

Shelley:
Lovely. You've got one last garden that's a work in progress. Tell me about that one.

Karin:
Yes, this is the courtyard. I've always wanted to do a stained glass mosaic. And I put it on the wall. But before I did this, a few years ago, we made a planter with stained glass in it. And it has over-wintered three years. Then, I experimented with bowling balls and then with stones.

Shelley:
So, all of these pieces of art I'm seeing in stained glass were kind of experiments leading up to this mosaic wall.

Karin:
Yes, they were all basically done the same with thin-set mortar. You put the glass on, grout it in, let that dry and then seal it.

Shelley:
So, this is something I could try at home?

Karin:
It's very simple, yes.

Shelley:
Karin, I want to thank you so much for sharing these gardens with us. It makes me look at bowling balls in a whole new light, thanks.

Karin:
Thank you.

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