A Memory Garden

A Memory Garden

Part of Ep. 1001 Uncommon Gardens

Travel to Somerset to visit a beautiful waterfall garden created by Richard and Darlene Hinke in memory of their daughter Lynn.

Premiere date: Mar 02, 2002

TRANSCRIPT+
Wisc Gardener Transcript: 

Shelley:
We garden for many reasons, the love of fresh produce, the beauty of blooming flowers. This garden was created in memory of Lynn Hinke, who died of cancer in 1992. Lynn's parents, Dick and Darlene Hinke, created the garden about two years after her death, not only in her memory, but as a way to help them survive her loss. Dick, why did you turn to gardening?

Dick:
Well Lynn and I had had a chance to talk about what we were going to do here before she died. Even though she was sick we still spent a lot of hours talking about what we could build and she had suggested maybe we could build a little water thingy out here on the side hill because it was just full of dead and dying trees and there was some grass there, but Darlene doesn't like to mow grass on the side hill so we decided we'd go ahead and do this little water thingy out here.

Shelley:
Uh, this is not a little water feature, Dick!

Dick:
Well it...

Shelley:
How many waterfalls do you have here, how many rocks?

Dick:
There's about eight different waterfalls and it's about a hundred feet from the bottom up to the top of the hill. And there's about a hundred and twenty tons of rock in it altogether too.

Shelley:
Did you haul that in too?

Dick:
Yeah, we had that hauled in from Jim Falls.

Shelley:
And plants, I see hundreds of varieties, how many are we looking at?

Dick:
Yeah, there's about 450 different plant species here, so there's plenty. There's about fifty different Hostas and fifteen different evergreens.

Shelley:
Now this is a team effort for you and Darlene, is that right?

Dick:
Yeah, Darlene is, I'm very fortunate, she's my resident master gardener here, she takes care of the place like, well, she just takes care of it that's all there is to it.

Shelley:
Well it's obviously a labor of love, but do you have any special spots or favorite plants?

Dick:
I think this area right behind us here, the Stoddard Crab Tree on the island with the Massachusetts Bear Berry ground cover underneath it is kind of neat. I've always liked that. I suppose it's because you can see the waterfalls around it.

Shelley:
Well and it's beautiful all year round too.

Dick:
Yeah it sure is, and then there's the Russian Sage and the Red Barberry, they look good this time of year in the fall, so it's nice this time of year.

Shelley:
And then you said there was a flower that was still blooming late season that you really enjoyed.

Dick:
Yeah, the Blue Flax, the little unpretentious Blue Flax up on the top there, it just pops up and reseeds itself and just makes itself at home wherever it feels like it.

Shelley:
So as you've proven we can have beauty in our garden even late into the growing season.

Dick:
Yeah, I think so too, and the ornamental grasses look good even through the winter they look good.

Shelley:
Now with this massive structure do you have a background in landscape architecture?

Dick:
Oh gosh no, I drive truck for a living. Well I was born and raised on a dairy farm over by Jim Falls so that's the extent of my horticulture background, four years of high school ag classes.

Shelley:
Well Dick you've created a thing of beauty, thank you so much for sharing this with us.

Dick:
Well thank you, Shelley. It was a pleasure having you're here.

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