Indoor Woody Arrangements

Indoor Woody Arrangements

Part of Ep. 1604 Winter Landscapes

Shelley Ryan learns how easy it is to create winter arrangements with plants and found objects from Ann Walker at Homeland Garden in Madison. Walker's creations include a bouquet of red popcorn, a miniature forest and a poinsettia vignette.

Premiere date: Nov 16, 2008

TRANSCRIPT+
Wisc Gardener Transcript: 

Shelley:
We've shown you how to add color to an outdoor winter landscape.  Now we're going to focus on the indoors.  I'm with Anne Walker, of Home Land Garden in the Madison area.  Anne, I've seen some of your work.  You create some wonderful winter vignettes for indoors. 

Anne:
Thank you.  During the summer, I do commercial landscaping.  I save a certain amount of my pruning for just such an occasion. 

Shelley:
In the winter, you move indoors and keep the garden theme going. 

Anne:
Absolutely. 

Shelley:
Can we start out with something simple? 

Anne:
This is something that's really simple.  It's a dry arrangement, so this is red popcorn. 

Shelley:
That's all that's in there?  That's pretty. 

Anne:
If you could hold this for me.  Then, I'm going to cut a couple pieces of cedar.  One of the nice things about the popcorn, is that it will hold the elements that you add to the arrangement. 

Shelley:
Like glass stones, or marbles or something but why not use something organic. 

Anne:
And then, you add just a couple more elements.  Pinecones for a little more vertical accent.  Then I have a curly stick, just for spice. 

Shelley:
A curly stick, I love it!  There you've got a little winter bouquet.  It's gorgeous.  Afterwards, what do you do with the popcorn? 

Anne:
I toss it out the back door. 

Shelley:
Squirrels will love it!  Let's move on to a little more complex.  This one is also a dry arrangement.  There's no water. 

Anne:
No water.  You have the floral foam. 

Shelley:
This green stuff. 

Anne:
That gives you the base to stick things in.  Then you use the moss to cover that.  Oh, okay.  These are simulating a birch forest.  The twigs on a real birch wouldn't be white.  These are painted sticks.  There's a little bit of eucalyptus and the evergreen. 

Shelley:
It looks like a miniature forest. 

Anne:
The really important thing about this is how you orient the top of the sticks.  If you pay attention to the bottom, the sticks kind of go off in different directions. 

Shelley:
Focus on the top of your miniature forest. 

Anne:
Absolutely. 

Shelley:
You've used a lot of evergreens that aren't in water.  Are there issues we have to worry about? 

Anne:
Two things, one, I like using the longer needled evergreen.  It doesn't tend to drop its needles as fast.  This will last quite some time.  As the arrangement dries, it does become flammable.  That's something to keep in mind. 

Shelley:
Just like an old Christmas tree keep an eye on it.  This is another vignette.  This is a wet one. 

Anne:
Because of the hydrangea, you need that moisture.  This is your "snow." 

Shelley:
This is fresh hydrangea.  You're still using the foam. 

Anne:
I've soaked the foam.  This plant is in place of the moss simulating snow and evergreen. 

Shelley:
This could be my favorite.  I love the miniature birch and the whole vertical element.  And the white "snow" is gorgeous.  Another thing that's real popular especially around Christmas and the holidays are the potted poinsettias I love them.  They're pretty.  After the holidays, though, what do you do with them? 

Anne:
You can keep them as house plants.  But you can also use them as cut flowers.  One of the nice things about after the holidays is they're inexpensive. 

Shelley:
Sure, because greenhouses are trying to move them.  You've got an arrangement with the red ones.  These are just cut flowers? 

Anne:
They're cut flowers, with a little bit of evergreen.  I've used the garden structure. 

Shelley:
Like a little trellis. 

Anne:
It creates a vertical element.  It also repeats the element in the painting behind it. 

Shelley:
It's all sitting in something I would not expect! 
Anne:
It's in a Frisbee. 

Shelley:
So you kind of like to use things like that. 

Anne:
I like using things that are convenient that are around the place so I don't have to make a special trip to get. 

Shelley:
Found objects and stuff sitting in the house.  Here's another way to use the cut flowers.  You did this to hide the outlet behind there.  This is simplicity itself. 

Anne:
It's really simple.  You have your poinsettias covering the front.  You have your vertical element and interest.  Then you have a little evergreen tucked in behind. 

Shelley:
And just a little water in there? 

Anne:
There's a little bit of water. 

Shelley:
Then you just tuck it all back and you've got something pretty.  Speaking of found objects and stuff around the house this is broken. 

Anne:
It's from a rummage sale.  It doesn't hold water.  If you want this arrangement to hold water you can use a juice glass.  What you're doing from there, what it also does it give you a bit of a base, much like the popcorn. 

Shelley:
Or the foam. 

Anne:
Right, so you're just covering the rim and creating the arrangement. 

Shelley:
Sticking stuff in there. 

Anne:
If you want to add a little pop and color you can feed these right into the arrangement. 

Shelley:
Oh, look at that! You've changed it already!

Anne:
Whoops! 

Shelley:
A little water in there, maybe would help.  This one might be my favorite, too.  A tough decision.  Tell me about this one.  This is gorgeous! 

Anne:
Again, it's really simple.  There's just three elements in here.  There's a tall, vertical element, then you have the poinsettias and the proteas. 

Shelley:
That's the yellow flower. 

Anne:
Right, and the protea is nice because it's echoing the center of the poinsettia. 

Shelley:
That's what I thought it was, that's great.  This is all in one vase of water. 

Anne:
Right, and the one thing you need to keep in mind is that poinsettias have a milky sap.  It can be irritating to your skin. 

Shelley:
This might be my favorite.  What a great way to bring color indoors in the winter.  Thank you, Anne. 

Anne:
Thank you. 

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