Hot Plants for the Garden

Hot Plants for the Garden

Part of Ep. 1403 Hot Plants

We travel to Songsparrow Farm and Nursery in Avalon to see what's new and hot in trees and shrubs. Roy Klehm shares his new favorite woody plants for the garden. He emphasizes colorful foliage and a variegated redbud.

Premiere date: Aug 30, 2006

TRANSCRIPT+
Wisc Gardener Transcript: 

Shelley Ryan:
Hi, I'm Shelley Ryan, host of the Wisconsin Gardener. Today, we focus on "Hot Plants" for summer. Horticulturist Jim Nienhuis shares his favorite peppers for Wisconsin and some of his pepper roasting secrets. In Neenah, we visit Colleen's Tough Times Vinegars to learn how to make and use a variety of vinegars including one with peppers. According to our guest, vinegar is even great on pasta. Also on the program, a look at mushroom gardening our expert from Peshtigo says it's easy and it's a perennial crop. First, we travel to Songsparrow Farm and Nursery in Avalon to see what's new and hot in trees and shrubs. That's up next on the Wisconsin Gardener.

Major funding for the Wisconsin Gardener is provided by Ariens Company, a Wisconsin brand since 1933 manufacturing outdoor power equipment including Ariens consumer mowers and Sno-Thro machines and Gravely commercial lawn equipment. Ariens, dedicated to keeping America beautiful. Major funding is also provided by a grant from the University of Wisconsin-Extension Horticulture Team. More information about UW-Extension gardening education is available at your county UW-Extension office and on the Web. UW-Extension, learning for life. Additional funding is provided by the Wisconsin Master Gardener Association.

Shelley:
I'm in Avalon, Wisconsin, with Roy Klehm, co-owner of Klehm Songsparrow Farm and Nursery. We're here to talk about some of the hot plants some of the new exciting stuff that's out. We're also going to talk a little about fall planting, because we forget to plant at that time of year.

Roy Klehm:
Fall's a wonderful time to plant especially when plants are container grown because you're planting the entire root system. Gently take it out of the pot and plant it, water it thoroughly and mulch it in, and maybe watch the water level until the plants freeze up around Thanksgiving time.

Shelley:
It's an easier, cooler time to be planting instead of running around like crazy in the spring.

Roy:
The roots tend to knit into the soil in the fall and start growing.

Shelley:
So everything here can be fall planted. Let's talk about what's exciting this year.

Roy:
This is a new dwarf Forsythia called "Citrus Swizzle." It has a nice variegated leaf pattern in the same mounded form.

Shelley:
So we don't care if this Forsythia blooms.

Roy:
That's right because of the variegated leaf. We have a new dwarf Weigela called "My Monet" with a tricolor variation. This was a mutation off the variety "Polka" so it has a beautiful pink flower and it's compact habit.

Shelley:
It's going to stay smaller, it's not a big bushy plant.

Roy:
And it's great to plant with your perennials.

Shelley:
Okay, interplant it with those.

Roy:
One of your favorites is this beautiful Fothergilla.

Shelley:
Look at the blue on that.

Roy:
This has blue, like Hostas. It's called "Blue Shadow." It's a Fothergilla major so it grows a little more upright than Fothergilla "Garden Eye."

Shelley:
Will we get the honey-scented flowers in spring?

Roy:
Yes, you will, a wonderful flower display.

Shelley:
Look at how unique that is and fall color.

Roy:
Fall color: oranges, reds.

Shelley:
Excellent.

Roy:
We have a new purple leaf Corylus, or Hazelnut called "Rosita" from the Oregon State University nut breeding program. A purple one popped out, and we talked the people into introducing this an ornamental plant.

Shelley:
Oh, it's gorgeous.

Roy:
Look at the underside, it's a different color. Yeah, beautiful.

Shelley:
So, I'm getting a sense that we're kind of focusing on foliage today.

Roy:
We are, because there are so many beautiful foliage patterns. Look at this new Sycamore Maple. This is called "Eskimo Sunset," Acer pseudoplatanus. It's a slow-growing tree, but it will become a big tree with time. Look at the underside of those leaves.

Shelley:
Oh, wow, that's even prettier. Each leaf looks like somebody hand-painted it.

Roy:
There's a sister, too, called Nizetii that has this variegated pattern. It's the greens, and the creams and the whites.

Shelley:
Are these all hardy from Wisconsin gardeners?

Roy:
These are hardy. With pseudoplatanus, find a protected area especially when they're young.

Shelley:
So not out in the middle of the wind.

Roy:
Right, and once you get the roots set they're a little bit hardier.

Shelley:
Okay, so baby them when they're young.

Roiy:
Oh, a little bit will pay dividends. Now especially for you I picked out this very rare tree. This is half Acer griseum, a paper bark maple and half Sycamore Maple. It has a nice leaf underside. I think it will develop the same exfoliating bark, but it might be a little hardier. And there's the graft. It's grafted down here.

Shelley:
If anything comes out below there, cut it off.

Roy:
That's right, that would be understock.

Shelley:
Well, if I can't kill it, that will be the best sign.

Roy:
A really hardy Sambucus with cut leaves is called "Black Lace." It has pretty pink flowers. What does this remind you of?

Shelley:
A Japanese Maple, which I can't grow.

Roy:
Hold that please, and here's a Japanese Maple. Put the leaves together, and it's a nice combination.

Shelley:
Actually that is, too. For most Wisconsin gardeners, the Sambucus is going to be a lot easier.

Roy:
It's really a tough plant. The wild ones grow along the ditches all throughout Wisconsin.

Shelley:
Well, that should give gardeners hope everywhere.

Roy:
We have some new red buds. There's a new golden leafed one called "Hearts of Gold" with a beautiful golden foliage. Isn't that pretty with the golden leaves?

Shelley:
And it will get the pink flowers in spring.

Roy:
Pink flowers. I would plant this next to some woods out of the wind, and with some protection.

Shelley:
So, it's a little marginal.

Roy:
There's a variegated one called "Silvercloud."

Shelley:
Now look at that, that is unique.

Roy:
The one in my garden, Shelley, is about five by five feet, and it's taken four years to get that big.

Shelley:
Again, baby them when they're young and you'll be rewarded later.

Roy:
Mulch is really important and good watering, especially in the fall. We have two new forms of Pagoda Dogwood, an all gold form called "Gold Bullion."

Shelley:
Look at the color of the buds, leaf buds are beautiful.

Roy:
And a variegated form called "Golden Shadows." Both require a little bit of shade, but they'll develop that nice horizontal branching structure of the Pagoda Dogwood.

Shelley:
Well, you've got a couple left. Let's take a look at these beautiful variegated ones.

Roy:
All three of them?

Shelley:
Sure.

Roy:
You have Cornus controverse "Variegata." It's a Giant Pacific Dogwood. The one that I have is Cornus kousa, "Summer Fun."

Shelley:
And again, it's marginal.

Roy:
Marginal, but it's been proven hardy in my garden so far in a couple winters.

Shelley:
Excellent, okay.

Roy:
I think this is the hardiest one. this is Cornus mas.

Shelley:
Oh, really!

Roy:
Cornelian Cherry Dogwood, a highly variegated form. It has beautiful red fall berries.

Shelley:
The berries are edible, so we can have cherry pie.

Roy:
You can have Cornelian cherry pie.

Shelley:
This teaches all of us to focus on foliage. I can't wait to try some of these. Thank you so much.

Roy:
You're welcome.

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