UW Space Place

New Horizons, the Mission to Pluto

Jim Lattis, Director, UW Space Place, follows the New Horizons spacecraft, launched in 2006, as it makes its closest approach to Pluto. Lattis shares close-up images of the dwarf planet and discusses the scientific observations resulting from the mission.

Climate Change, from Global to Local

Brenna Holzhauer, Director of Exhibits, Aldo Leopold Nature Center, Madison, explores how to talk about the local effects of climate change and global warming with your children, students and families. Holzhauer discusses the basic science surrounding climate change and simple changes that can help the environment.

The Hubble Space Telescope

Jay Gallagher, Professor, Department of Astronomy, UW-Madison, celebrates the 25th anniversary of the Hubble Space Telescope and explores its Wisconsin connection.

How to Build a Galaxy in Three Easy Steps

Stephen Pardy, Graduate Student, Department of Astronomy, UW-Madison, explains that with the appropriate ingredients: hydrogen gas, stars and dark matter, the laws of physics and evolution, you can create a galaxy.

How Satellites Monitor Wisconsin's Climate

David Liebl, Faculty Associate, College of Engineering, UW-Madison, discusses weather, Wisconsin’s climate, the projection for the future of our climate, and how we’re using satellite remote sensing capabilities to observe climate change impacts on the state.

How UW's Astronomers Measured the Universe

Jim Lattis, Director, UW Space Place, examines the part UW astronomers played in a major re-evaluation of the size of the Milky Way between 1930 and 1936. The astronomers established which key features determined our modern concept of a galaxy.

My Adventure in the Stratosphere

Jean Creighton, Director, Manfred Olson Planetarium, UW-Milwaukee, reflects on her selection by NASA to fly on the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA). Creighton was one of 24 teachers chosen to observe the earth’s atmosphere from 40,000 feet.

Finding Magnetospheres of Massive Stars

Richard Townsend, Assistant Professor, Department of Astronomy, UW-Madison, discusses the vast, ghostly glowing stars in the universe called magnetospheres and how using polarized starlight allows astronomers to study them.

Supernova Explosions are Weirder than You Think

Jennifer L. Hoffman, Associate Professor, Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Denver, discusses the tools astronomers use to investigate the complex, changing shapes of supernovae. Studying these shapes can teach us about stellar life cycles.

How Video Games Help Astronomy

Nick Hill, Graduate Student, Department of Astronomy, UW-Madison, discusses using video gaming technology to predict how complex star systems appear when viewed from Earth.


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