UW Joined With Madison Schools To Inspire Future Teachers

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Premiere Date: 
July 10, 2015

UW Joined With Madison Schools To Inspire Future Teachers

Madison schools' TEEM program supports minority high schoolers interested in teaching.

Episode Transcript

ZAC SCHULTZ:

THE MADISON PUBLIC SCHOOLS RECENTLY LAUNCHED A PROGRAM TO ENCOURAGE MINORITY STUDENTS TO PURSUE TEACHING CAREERS. TOMORROW'S EDUCATORS FOR EQUALITY IN MADISON OR TEEM PROVIDES SUPPORT TO HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS OF COLOR WHO HOPE TO ONE DAY TEACH IN THE MADISON SCHOOL DISTRICT. DURING SUMMER PROGRAMS ON THE UW CAMPUS, WE CAUGHT UP WITH MADISON WEST HIGH SCHOOL'S DIANNA MURRAY AND ASKED HER WHY SHE'S MOTIVATED TO ONE DAY RUN A CLASSROOM IN MADISON.

DIANNA MURRAY:

I FEEL LIKE IN MMSD, THEIR MESSAGE, NOT INTENTIONALLY, BUT THEIR MESSAGE IS SUCCESS HAS A COLOR, AND IF YOU ARE NOT THIS COLOR, OR IF YOU DO NOT LOOK THIS WAY, YOU CAN'T BE AS SUCCESSFUL. AND I FEEL LIKE IF YOU HAVE TEACHERS THAT CAN BE THERE TO SHOW YOU THAT YOU CAN ACHIEVE GREAT THINGS, THAT YOU WILL PUSH YOURSELF TO ACHIEVE GREAT THINGS.

ZAC SCHULTZ:

OUR NEXT GUEST IS THE DIRECTOR OF THE UW-MADISON OFFICE THAT HOUSES THE TEEM PROGRAM. BETH GILES-KLINKNER RUNS THE EDUCATION OUTREACH AND PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM AT THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. THANKS FOR BEING HERE TODAY.

BETH GILES-KLINKNER:

MY PLEASURE.

ZAC SCHULTZ:

NOW, TO ADDRESS WHAT WE JUST HEARD DIANNA MURRAY SAY, DOES SUCCESS HAVE A COLOR?

BETH GILES-KLINKNER:

I BELIEVE THAT WE ARE FACING A SIGNIFICANT ACHIEVEMENT GAP, AN OPPORTUNITY IN MANY PLACES ACROSS OUR ENTIRE COUNTRY. CERTAINLY IN MADISON I'M REALLY PLEASED WITH THE EFFORTS THAT THE MADISON METROPOLITIAN SCHOOL DISTRICT AND THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN ARE TAKING TO DISRUPT THAT REALITY.

ZAC SCHULTZ:

SO IN MANY CASES IT DOES. I MEAN, PEOPLE SEE WHAT'S REFLECTED BACK AT THEM.

BETH GILES-KLINKNER:

IN MANY CASES THERE IS AN ACHIEVEMENT GAP. IT'S VERY DOCUMENTED HERE AND, AGAIN, OTHER PLACES ACROSS OUR COUNTRY.

ZAC SCHULTZ:

SO WHAT'S THE VALUE TO STUDENTS OF COLOR TO SEE A TEACHER OF THE SAME RACE IN THE CLASSROOM WITH THEM?

BETH GILES-KLINKNER:

I THINK AS DIANNA ARTICULATED AND MANY OF US KNOW, WHEN A STUDENT SEES A TEACHER OF COLOR IN FRONT OF THEM LEADING THE CLASSROOM, THEY'RE MORE APT TO STRIVE FOR THE SUCCESSES THAT THEY SEE THAT TEACHER PORTRAYING. THEY KNOW THEY CAN ACHIEVE JUST LIKE THE TEACHER IN FRONT OF THEM DID. OR A LEADER OF COLOR, A SCHOOL PRINCIPAL. OR REALLY ANY CAREER WHEN STUDENTS SEE THEMSELVES REFLECTED IN THOSE CAREERS, THEY KNOW THAT THEY CAN ACHIEVE THEM.

ZAC SCHULTZ:

IS THIS MORE IMPORTANT IN YOUNGER GRADES OR AS KIDS BECOME HIGH SCHOOLERS IS THERE A DIFFERENCE THERE?

BETH GILES-KLINKNER:

I THINK IT'S IMPORTANT ACROSS ALL GRADES. CERTAINLY WE'RE TARGETING HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS WITH THE TEEM SCHOLAR PROGRAM BECAUSE WE FEEL IT'S AN AGE IN WHICH THEY CAN MAKE A DECISION ABOUT THEIR FUTURE PROFESSION. WE'RE CAPITALIZING ON YOUNG PEOPLE'S DRIVE TO MAKE OUR WORLD A BETTER PLACE. YOU'LL SEE A LOT OF THE T-SHIRTS AND BRACELETS THAT QUOTE GANDHI WITH BE THE CHANGE YOU WANT TO SEE IN THE WORLD. WE FEEL LIKE THE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS REALLY HAVE THE ENERGY TO DO THAT. AND SO WE BEGAN THE PROGRAM AT THE HIGH SCHOOL LEVEL TO CAPTURE AND BUILD UPON THAT DESIRE TO MAKE OUR WORLD AND OUR SOCIETY AND THEIR OWN COMMUNITY HERE IN MADISON A BETTER PLACE. WE HAVE OTHER OUTREACH PROGRAMS THAT WORK WITH MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS AND CERTAINLY HOPE TO INVOLVE THEM MORE IN SEEING EDUCATION AS A VIABLE PROFESSION TO REALLY IMPACT OUR FUTURE.

ZAC SCHULTZ:

NOW, MOST OF THE STUDENTS IN THE PROGRAM ARE YOUNG. THEY'RE HIGH SCHOOL. SO IT WILL TAKE A FEW YEARS BEFORE THEY COULD EVEN BE POTENTIALLY IN A CLASSROOM. SO WHAT DO WE DO IN THE MEANTIME?

BETH GILES-KLINKNER:

CORRECT. WE ARE WORKING ON PROGRAMMING AT THE HIGH SCHOOL YEARS THAT HELP THE TEEM SCHOLARS UNDERSTAND HOW BEING A TEACHER CAN REALLY BE A CHANGE AGENT FOR YOUR COMMUNITY. IN THE FIRST YEAR THEY'LL DO SOME ACTION RESEARCH AROUND AN EDUCATIONAL ISSUE. SO THEY'LL BE INVESTIGATING AN EDUCATIONAL ISSUE RIGHT HERE IN THEIR OWN COMMUNITY AND SORT OF DIGGING INTO IT, COLLECTING DATA AROUND IT AND PRODUCING RESULTS IN A SUMMARY TYPE FASHION ABOUT THEIR ISSUE. THEIR JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEAR THEY'LL BE INVOLVED IN A LOT OF JOB SHADOWING, A LOT OF HANDS-ON TEACHING EXPERIENCING AND CONTINUING TO FOSTER THAT IDEA THAT TEACHING REALLY CAN BE AN IMPACT ON THE COMMUNITY. THAT THEY ARE ABLE TO BE A CHANGE AGENT FOR THEIR WORLD. AND BY THE TIME THEY GET READY TO APPLY TO UW-MADISON THEY'LL BE IN THE BEST POSITION FOR ADMISSION AND TO BE THE KIND OF TEACHER THAT WE HOPE FINDS THEIR WAY BACK TO THE MADISON METROPOLITAN SCHOOL DISTRICT.

ZAC SCHULTZ:

HOW MANY KIDS DO YOU WANT TO SEE BACK IN A MADISON CLASSROOM TO SAY THAT THIS WAS A SUCCESS?

BETH GILES-KLINKNER:

WE'D LOVE TO SEE ALL OF THEM. WE KNOW THAT MAY NOT BE REALISTIC, THEY'RE YOUNG PEOPLE AND DIFFERENT FACTOR PLAY OUT IN THEIR LIVES. BUT THE COMMITMENT THAT WE HAVE TO THESE YOUNG PEOPLE IS TO SEE THEM ALL THE WAY THROUGH. AND FOR THEM TO BE THE TEACHER THAT STUDENTS LIKE THEM ARE LOOKING AT SOMEDAY SAYING, YES, I CAN ACCOMPLISH ANYTHING.

ZAC SCHULTZ:

ALL RIGHT. THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR YOUR TIME TODAY.

BETH GILES-KLINKNER:

THANK YOU.

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