WPT's "In Wisconsin" Features Reports on How Airplane De-icing Chemicals Effect the Environment

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January 12, 2011

For More Information:
Lynn Brockmeyer, WPT publicist, 608-263-3364, lynn.brockmeyer@wpt.org
Joel Waldinger, series producer, 608-890-2840,joel.waldinger@wpt.org
 
The next episode of In Wisconsin on Wisconsin Public Television (WPT) features reports from around the state that look at the effects of airplane de-icing chemicals on the environment, the state’s expanding dairy goat farming industry, Great Grey Owls in Wisconsin’s Northwoods and a University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire student who has a personal connection with stem cell research.

The newsmagazine airs 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 20 on WPT and is available in high definition. WPT will encore the program at 10:30 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 23. The program also will air at 11:30 a.m. on Milwaukee’s MPTV and on WDSE-TV in Duluth at 4 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 23.

De-icing planes is necessary to insure passenger safety but every year airports release large quantities of de-icing chemicals into the environment. Some states like Wisconsin require airports to recapture a small portion of these chemicals. In Wisconsin Reporter Liz Koerner shows viewers how researchers are working to help save the environment around Milwaukee’s Gen. Mitchell International Airport.

The report is part of a new WPT initiative called Quest, a project that will delve into issues about Wisconsin's environment. For more information, visit questwisconsin.org on the Web for a multi-media approach to WPT’s environmental reporting.

In Wisconsin Reporter Andy Soth visits one of the state’s largest goat farms near Beaver Dam as Wisconsin makes a push to grow its specialty cheese market. At another farm in Cross Plains meet Diana Murphy, a farmer whose homemade goat cheese is drawing a loyal following.

In 2005, an In Wisconsin report featured an unexpected visitor to Wisconsin's Northwoods, Great GreyOwls. That winter food was scarce in Canada and Great Grey Owls, rare to Wisconsin in winter, moved south. It was predicted they could return within five years. In Wisconsin Reporter Jo Garrett takes viewers back to Douglas County to see these phantoms of the north.

For the past three summers WiCell, the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s stem cell research center, has hosted students from rural Wisconsin high school students to help them learn about this emerging medical technology and science options at the university.  In Wisconsin Reporter Art Hackett profiles a former camper, now studying at University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, who has a very personal connection with stem cell research.

This program’s video postcard features a scenic look at Pewits Nest outside of Baraboo.
To learn more about what is coming up on the series, visit the In Wisconsin website at wpt.org/inwisconsin where the “Producer’s Journal” blog offers behind-the-scenes insights and information about reports currently in production.

Funding for In Wisconsin is provided, in part, by Alliant Energy, and Animal Dental Dentistry and Oral Surgery Specialists LLC of Milwaukee, Oshkosh and Minneapolis.
WPT is a service of the Educational Communications Board and University of Wisconsin-Extension.

Wisconsin Public Television is a place to grow through learning on WHA-TV, Madison; WPNE-TV,Green Bay; WHRM-TV, Wausau; WLEF-TV, Park Falls; WHLA-TV, La Crosse; and WHWC-TV, Menomonie-Eau Claire.

DESCRIPTION: IN WISCONSIN #911
In Wisconsin reports on the effects of airplane de-icing chemicals on the environment, the state’s expanding dairy goat industry, Great Grey Owls in the Northwoods and a University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire student who has a personal connection with stem cell research.